comscore District 29 - Alvin K.C. Au (D) | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Election

District 29 – Alvin K.C. Au (D)

Full Name: Alvin K.C. Au

Name on Ballot: Alvin K.C. Au

Age: 71

Political Party: Democrat

Running For: House

District: 29

Email Address: FriendsForAlvinAu@gmail.com

Current Job: Attorney at law

Place of birth: Honolulu

Campaign website: www.AlvinAuHawaii.com

Job history past 10 years:

>> U.S. Army officer, colonel, infantry (30 years, retired); Decorated Vietnam War combat veteran

>> U.S. Army Hawaii, detailed inspector general (8 years, retired)

>> U.S. Rep. Neil Abercrombie, military liaison (2 years)

>> City and County of Honolulu: director, Department of Enterprise Services, deputy director, Department of Facility Maintenance, deputy director, Department of Parks and Recreation (Total of 18 years of service)

>> Attorney at law (38 years)

>> State of Hawaii Judiciary, Family Court Services administrator (eight years)

Ever run for public office? If so, when? Outcome? No

Other civic experience or community service?

>> Downtown Neighborhood Board (25 years; chairman, six years)

>> Go For Broke Association, director, nonprofit (38 years)

>> Elks Lodge, No. 616, life member (32 years)

>> See Dai Doo Society, member (19 years)

Anything else you’d like voters to know about you?

I was born, raised, and have lived in downtown Chinatown most of my life, and hold great respect and understanding around our community and district issues. I’ve been instilled with strong values around family, honesty, caring for others, respect for elders, and giving back time/service to my community.

What makes you qualified to be a state representative?

I’m not only passionate and dedicated to improving my community but have years of federal, state, and city governmental knowledge, especially in budgetary and fiscal expenditure. I have abundant leadership and management experience, am a great communicator, can resolve issues amicably, and would be a positive resource for District 29.

Gov. Ige says he will once again propose increases to the state gas tax, vehicle weight tax and state registration fees to help pay for state road projects. Do you support his proposal?

Yes. However, this minimal tax increase must specifically be dedicated to the sole use of improving state roads, and not be delegated to any other use or projects which are unrelated to road improvements. The current road conditions are deplorably bad, and such unimproved roads will cause unsafe driving conditions.

If the Legislature is again asked to extend Oahu’s half-percent excise tax surcharge to finance construction or operation of the rail system, would you support such an extension?

Yes, the 0.5 percent excise tax should be used exclusively to finance the rail system. The rail should be completed as planned, and to change the initial course would be irresponsible. Any delays will increase the construction cost. There is a call for open transparency and better communication with the public.

Should the state play a role in cracking down on illegal vacation rentals in Hawaii?

Yes. All dwelling rentals should pay the required excise tax which should be fairly passed on to the tenant. The legislative body should enact laws to have owners report such rental income timely. If such income is not reported, the required tax should be subject to penalty and interest cost.

Should the Legislature require that police officers in Hawaii use “body cameras,” and help to fund the use of those cameras?

Yes. Such equipment will assist law enforcement personnel to better support their actions and address any doubts when those actions are called to question. Such information will improve the law enforcement personnel to be better officers and can confirm and maintain their actions were warranted and enforceable.

Dozens of police officers in Hawaii are disciplined each year for committing crimes or violating departmental policies, but little information is released about the officers or their cases. Do you think there needs to be greater public disclosure?

Yes. Such information can be released under the Privacy Law subject to redaction. Generally, personnel information are protected by law enforcement collective-bargaining labor contracts, and that information may not be released. Enacted laws will allow waiving personnel information from the Privacy Act requirements and create transparency for the public.

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