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Denver moves toward becoming first city to allow pot in public

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Rachel Schaefer, of Denver, smoked marijuana, in Dec. 2012, on the official opening night of Club 64, a marijuana-specific social club, where a New Year’s Eve party was held in Denver. Denver is starting work on becoming the first city in the nation to allow marijuana clubs and public pot use in places like restaurants, yoga studios and art galleries. Voters narrowly approved the “social use” measure last November.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Partygoers smoked marijuana, in Dec. 2013, during a Prohibition-era themed New Year’s Eve party at a bar in Denver, celebrating the start of retail pot sales. Denver is starting work on becoming the first city in the nation to allow marijuana clubs and public pot use in places like restaurants, yoga studios and art galleries.

DENVER >> Denver is starting work today on becoming the first city in the nation to allow marijuana clubs and public pot use in places such as coffee shops, yoga studios and art galleries.

Voters narrowly approved the “social use” measure last November. But the ballot proposal didn’t spell out many rules for how the marijuana could be consumed, beyond saying that the drug can’t be smoked inside and that patrons must be over 21.

A workgroup made up of Denver business owners, city pot regulators and marijuana opponents starts work on suggesting regulations in the afternoon.

The state Liquor Control Board already has decreed that no businesses with a liquor license can allow marijuana use. That leaves it to restaurants that don’t serve alcohol and other event spaces.

There’s no deadline for Denver to finalize rules. Supporters hope to see the city start accepting applications by this summer.

Emmett Reistroffer, a cannabis-industry consultant who ran last year’s campaign to allow public marijuana use, said the eventual regulations will require neighborhood approval for any pot clubs or coffee shops.

Reistroffer organized a recent public meeting about the measure and invited interested businesses, saying a few dozen showed up to find out more.

“There are plenty of places in Denver where you can find neighbors who want this kind of establishment,” Reistroffer said.

The organizer of the opposition campaign also is attending today’s meeting. Rachel O’Bryan said she’s concerned that businesses won’t be able to safeguard against intoxicated patrons driving home.

The measure does not allow participating businesses to sell pot, so they won’t have any control over what people are consuming. Patrons would have to bring their own marijuana, whether its edibles they use inside or joints they smoke in outdoor areas.

“If you are neither serving nor counting the potency of the product, nor counting how much they consume, how are you protecting the public when they leave your property?” O’Bryan asked.

A bill to allow pot clubs statewide is pending at the state Legislature. The pot-club bill has bipartisan support but uncertain prospects, especially as Colorado and other legal pot states await word on whether Donald Trump’s administration will tolerate pot businesses in states flouting federal drug law.

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  • Denver continues to be miles (high) ahead of any other state in their progressive, business friendly pakalolo agenda. One day, many years from now, Hawaii may just catch on. Hawaii is bogged down on getting the dispensaries open. So behind in the grand scheme of the new worldwide Pakalolo game. Hawaii could be such a world player, but chooses to be rather lame and outdated. Why? because business is just fine as is.

    • If a social experiment needs to be done, let it be done there. In five to ten years we should be able to gather some persuasive data on whether legalized public use with American subjects is a net benefit to society. As a guess, I’m inclined to think a cost-benefit analysis might appear remarkably like that for legal consumption of wine and spirits.

  • I’ve stood on a sidewalk in SF and watched a group of adults pass a joint around. Right in front of the mall entrance. Nobody batted an eye, not even the SFPD. One day Hawaii will be similar.

  • If pot is legalized for recreational use then it’s use should be be restricted to private clubs or residences and not allowed in public places such as restaurants,streets or parks similar to consuming alcoholic beverages in public…..

  • Wow! I’ll buy a ticket to Denver for a visit if that happens! It actually makes good business sense, as long as they’re strict in not allowing minors to partake. Lots of Tax Revenue!!! $$$ Denver City Officials are akamai…

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