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Scientists tout value of studying dolphins in captivity

  • Dennis Oda / doda@staradvertiser.com

    Julie Rocho-Levine, in water on right, manager of marine animals for Dolphin Quest at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, and her assistant Nicole West, in water on left, place a flow meter over a dolphin’s blowhole to capture the air the dolphin exhales after it swims underwater. They are helping marine scientists Austin Allen, Julie van der Hoop and Andreas Fahlman, front to back, and Alex Shorter, not pictured, conduct research on dolphins.

  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Julie Rocho-Levine, right, manager of marine animals for Dolphin Quest at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, and her assistant Nicole West interact with dolphins Lono and Nainoa.

  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Julie Rocho-Levine, right, manager of marine animals for Dolphin Quest at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, and her assistant Nicole West place a flow meter over a dolphin’s blowhole to capture the air it exhales after swimming underwater.

  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Scientist Andreas Fahlman and Nicole West of Dolphin Quest feed two of the dolphins.

Hoku, a 27-year-old Atlantic bottlenose dolphin, doesn’t look much like a laboratory rat as he playfully swims through the Dolphin Quest lagoon at the Kahala Hotel & Resort. Read more

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