Hal Blaine, drummer who played on thousands of hits, dies
  • Monday, March 25, 2019
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Hal Blaine, drummer who played on thousands of hits, dies

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2008

    In this photo, Don Randi, from left, Glen Campbell and Hal Blaine, representing session musicians known as The Wrecking Crew, hold up their hands after placing them in the cement following the induction ceremony for Hollywood’s RockWalk in Los Angeles. Drummer Blaine, who played on many of the biggest hits in music history, has died. Blaine’s son-in-law Andy Johnson tells The Associated Press that Blaine died of natural causes today at his home in Palm Desert, California. He was 90.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2008

    In this June 25 photo, Hal Blaine holds up his hands covered in cement after placing them in wet cement with Don Randi and Glen Campbell, representing The Wrecking Crew following an induction ceremony for Hollywood’s RockWalk in Los Angeles. Drummer Blaine, who played on many of the biggest hits in music history, has died. Blaine’s son-in-law Andy Johnson tells The Associated Press that Blaine died of natural causes today at his home in Palm Desert, California. He was 90.

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LOS ANGELES >> Hal Blaine, the Hall of Fame session drummer and virtual one-man soundtrack of the 1960s and ’70s who played on the songs of Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and the Beach Boys and laid down one of music’s most memorable opening riffs on the Ronettes’ “Be My Baby,” died today.

Blaine died of natural causes at his home in Palm Desert, California, his son-in-law, Andy Johnson, told The Associated Press. He was 90.

On hearing of his death, the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson called him “the greatest drummer ever.”

The winner of a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award last year, Blaine’s name was known by few outside the music industry, even in his prime.

But just about anyone with a turntable, radio or TV heard his drumming on songs that included Presley’s “Return to Sender,” the Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man,” Barbra Streisand’s “The Way We Were,” the Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations,” dozens of hits produced by Phil Spector, and the theme songs to “Batman,” ”The Partridge Family” and dozens of other shows.”

“Hal Blaine was such a great musician and friend that I can’t put it into words,” Wilson said in a tweet that included an old photo of him and Blaine sitting at the piano. “Hal taught me a lot, and he had so much to do with our success — he was the greatest drummer ever.”

As a member of the Los Angeles-based studio band “The Wrecking Crew,” which also featured keyboard player Leon Russell, bassist Carol Kaye and guitarist Tommy Tedesco, Blaine forged a hard-earned virtuosity and versatility that enabled him to adapt quickly to a wide range of popular music. According to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, he played on 40 No. 1 hits, 150 top 10 songs and eight songs that won Grammys for record of the year, including Sinatra’s “Strangers In the Night” and Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” He may be the only drummer to back Presley, Sinatra and John Lennon.

Some accounts have Blaine playing on 35,000 songs, but he believed that around 6,000 was more accurate, still making him a strong contender for the most recorded drummer in history. In 2000, he was part of the first group of session players to be inducted into the Rock Hall of Fame.

Out of so many notable sessions, his signature moment was the attention-grabbing “on the four” solo — Bum-ba-bum-BOOM — that launched the classic “Be My Baby,” a hit for the Ronettes in 1963 that helped define Spector’s overpowering “Wall of Sound” productions.

The song remained a radio staple for decades and got new life in the ’70s when it was used to open Martin Scorcese’s “Mean Streets” and again in the ’80s when it was featured in “Dirty Dancing.”

Few drum parts have been so widely imitated, from Billy Joel’s “Say Goodbye to Hollywood” to The Jesus and Mary Chain’s “Just Like Honey.”

In a 2005 interview with Modern Drummer magazine, Blaine said that he wasn’t quite sure how he came up with the solo. To the best of his memory, he accidentally missed a beat while the song was being recorded and improvised by only playing the beat on the fourth note.

“And I continued to do that,” he recalled. “Phil might have said, ‘Do that again.’ Somebody loved it, in any event. It’s just one of those things that sometimes happens.”

Blaine is survived by his daughter Michelle Blaine, and seven grandchildren.

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