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6 paddlers rescued after canoe takes on water off Diamond Head

  • COURTESY U.S. COAST GUARD / PHOTO BY OLGA DAVIS

    A Coast Guard crew member aboard a 45-foot response boat tends to paddlers from a submerged canoe off Diamond Head, Sunday. Five paddlers were rescued through a joint-effort between the Coast Guard, Honolulu Fire Department and city Ocean Safety. A remaining paddler stayed with the canoe as an Ocean Safety Jet-ski operator towed it to shore, Coast Guard officials said

  • COURTESY U.S. COAST GUARD / PHOTO BY OLGA DAVIS

    Five paddlers were rescued Sunday off Diamond Head through a joint-effort between the Coast Guard, Honolulu Fire Department and city Ocean Safety. A remaining paddler stayed with the canoe as an Ocean Safety Jet-ski operator towed it to shore, Coast Guard officials said

  • COURTESY U.S. COAST GUARD / PHOTO BY OLGA DAVIS

    A Coast Guard 45-foot response boat crew responds to a sinking canoe off Oahu Sunday. The paddlers were rescued through a joint-effort between the Coast Guard, Honolulu Fire Department and city Ocean Safety.

Crews from the Coast Guard, Honolulu Fire Department and city Ocean Safety rescued six paddlers from a sinking outrigger canoe off of Diamond Head Sunday.

The Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a call from the HFD at 11:40 a.m. about paddlers who reported their canoe was taking on water about a mile off Black Point near Diamond Head, according to a Coast Guard news release.

The Coast Guard deployed a 45-foot response boat and HFD and Ocean Safety lifeguards launched a fire boat, Air 1 helicopter and Jet Ski to assist.

Crews aboard the response boat rescued five paddlers while one paddler stayed with the canoe as Ocean Safety used the Jet Ski to tow it to shore.

No injuries were reported.

“The boaters made the right call by notifying the Honolulu Fire Department of their predicament quickly,” said Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvin Seguin. “It is always best to play it safe when out on the water and report if you believe you are in trouble. We recommend waterway users take multiple forms of communication for this purpose — cell phones, marine radios, and personal locator beacons.”

Weather conditions were winds at 17 mph and seas up to 4 feet at the time of the rescue.

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