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Alleged ‘extreme cyberstalker’ from Hawaii waives extradition to Utah

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS / March 21
                                A warning sign and a police vehicle sit outside Walt Gilmore’s home in North Salt Lake, Utah, in March. U.S. prosecutors arrested Loren Okamura, a Hawaii man, on Nov. 22, who they accuse of sending hundreds of unwanted service providers to the Utah home, including plumbers and prostitutes.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS / March 21

    A warning sign and a police vehicle sit outside Walt Gilmore’s home in North Salt Lake, Utah, in March. U.S. prosecutors arrested Loren Okamura, a Hawaii man, on Nov. 22, who they accuse of sending hundreds of unwanted service providers to the Utah home, including plumbers and prostitutes.

The Hawaii man indicted for allegedly cyberstalking a Utah family waived his right to a detention hearing in Hawaii today, opting to have it in the prosecuting district.

During his hearing at the U.S. District Court in Honolulu this afternoon, Loren Okamura, 44, chose to remain in custody in Hawaii until transported to Utah.

His attorney, Sharron Rancourt, noted that Okamura’s wife died earlier this year and that he and his family were grieving. She said it has been “a difficult situation and a difficult time for him and for his family.”

The Associated Press reported that Okamura was arrested Friday in Honolulu after being indicted last month for allegedly sending over 500 people to a Salt Lake City family for unwanted services including food deliveries, repairs and even prostitutes, which went on for over a year.

He allegedly targeted a man and his adult daughter. He sent threatening messages to her and posted her picture and address online, prosecutors said.

A U.S. prosecutor called it “extreme cyberstalking.”

U.S. Attorney John Huber said Okamura’s relationship with the family was not random.

Investigators had targeted Okamura since January but it took time to get enough evidence because of Okamura’s use of encryption and apps, which helped keep him anonymous. He didn’t have a permanent job or address — and his ability to mask his phone location — made him difficult find and arrest him.

It required a 15-hour search and a team of Utah officers who flew to Honolulu and FBI agents to finally locate him in a supermarket.


The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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