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VIDEO: Somber ceremony recalls those killed in Pearl Harbor attack

  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Pearl Harbor survivors are honored in a walk following the 78th ceremony marking the anniversary of the Japanese attack.

    DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Pearl Harbor survivors are honored in a walk following the 78th ceremony marking the anniversary of the Japanese attack.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Don Long, left, and other Pearl Harbor survivors talk before the 78th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor at a ceremony at Pearl Harbor. Long was alone on an anchored military seaplane in the middle of Kaneohe Bay across the island from Pearl Harbor when Japanese warplanes started striking Hawaii on December 7, 1941, watching from afar as the attack that killed and wounded thousands unfolded. The Japanese planes reached his base on Kaneohe Bay soon after Pearl Harbor was hit, and the young sailor saw buildings and planes explode all around him.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Don Long, left, and other Pearl Harbor survivors talk before the 78th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor at a ceremony at Pearl Harbor. Long was alone on an anchored military seaplane in the middle of Kaneohe Bay across the island from Pearl Harbor when Japanese warplanes started striking Hawaii on December 7, 1941, watching from afar as the attack that killed and wounded thousands unfolded. The Japanese planes reached his base on Kaneohe Bay soon after Pearl Harbor was hit, and the young sailor saw buildings and planes explode all around him.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2018
                                Pearl Harbor survivors salute during the National Anthem at a ceremony in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii marking the 77th anniversary of the Japanese attack. Survivors and members of the public are expected to gather in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7 to remember those killed when Japanese planes bombed the Hawaii naval base 78 years ago and launched the U.S. into World War II. Organizers plan for about a dozen survivors of the attack to attend the annual ceremony, the youngest of whom are now in their late 90s.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2018

    Pearl Harbor survivors salute during the National Anthem at a ceremony in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii marking the 77th anniversary of the Japanese attack. Survivors and members of the public are expected to gather in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7 to remember those killed when Japanese planes bombed the Hawaii naval base 78 years ago and launched the U.S. into World War II. Organizers plan for about a dozen survivors of the attack to attend the annual ceremony, the youngest of whom are now in their late 90s.

More than 2,000 people attended a ceremony today to remember those killed when Japanese planes bombed Pearl Harbor 78 years ago and launched the U.S. into World War II.

Organizers of the public event say attendees included about a dozen survivors of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack, the youngest of whom are now in their late 90s.

Herb Elfring, 97, of Jackson, Michigan, said being back at Pearl Harbor reminds him of all those who have lost their lives.

“It makes you think of all the servicemen who have passed ahead of me. As a Pearl Harbor survivor, I’m one of the last chosen few I guess.” He’s the only member of his old regiment still living.

Elfring was in the Army, assigned to the 251st Coast Artillery, part of the California National Guard. The unit’s job was to protect airfields but they weren’t expecting an attack that morning.

Elfring was standing at the edge of his barracks at Camp Malakole a few miles down the coast from Pearl Harbor, reading a bulletin board when Japanese Zero planes flew over. “I could hear it coming but didn’t pay attention to it until the strafing bullets were hitting the pavement about 15 feet (4.57 meters) away from me,” he said.

A moment of silence was held at 7:55 a.m., the same time the assault began. U.S. Air Force F-22 fighter jets flying overhead in missing man formation broke the quiet.

Retired Navy Adm. Harry Harris, currently the U.S. ambassador to South Korea, was scheduled to deliver remarks, along with Interior Secretary David Bernhardt.

The ceremony comes on the heels of two deadly shootings at Navy bases this week, one at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and another at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida.

Rear Adm. Robert Chadwick, commander of Navy Region Hawaii, said the military community has received an outpouring of love and support from Hawaii after the shooting at “our beloved shipyard” earlier this week.

“Our thoughts and prayers remain with the families of the victims and everyone affected,” Chadwick said.

A Pearl Harbor National Memorial spokesman said security was beefed up as usual for the annual event.

The 1941 aerial assault killed more than 2,300 U.S. troops. Nearly half — or 1,177 — were Marines and sailors serving on the USS Arizona, a battleship moored in the harbor. The vessel sank within nine minutes of being hit, taking most of its crew down with it.

Lou Conter, 98, was the only survivor from the USS Arizona to make it to this year’s ceremony. Two other survivors are still living. Conter was sick last year and couldn’t come. He said he likes to attend to remember those who lost their lives.

“It’s always good to come back and pay respect to them and give them the top honors that they deserve,” Conter said.

Conter said his doctor has vowed to keep him well until he’s 100 so he can return for the 80th anniversary.

The USS Arizona still rests in the harbor today and is a grave for more than 900 men killed in the attack. Each year, nearly 2 million people visit the white memorial structure built above the ship.

An internment ceremony is scheduled to be held at sunset on the memorial for one of the Arizona’s sailors who survived the attack, Lauren Bruner. He died earlier this year at age 98.

Bruner asked that an urn with his ashes be placed inside the Arizona’s sunken hull upon his death. His ashes will join the remains of 44 shipmates who managed to live through the attack but wanted to be laid to rest in the ship. Bruner explained before he died that he preferred being interred in the Arizona so he could join his buddies and because of the memorial’s high number of visitors.

Bruner is expected to be the last Arizona crew member to be interred on the ship. The three Arizona survivors still living plan to be laid to rest with their families.

Conter, the USS Arizona survivor from Grass Valley, California, said he will attend Bruner’s interment ceremony later Saturday. He said Bruner was a good friend who joined the Navy and the USS Arizona a year ahead of Conter.

“Lauren was a good sailor, a good man. I’m glad he made it through Pearl,” he said.

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