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U.S. seeks forfeiture of 2 more properties connected with illegal gaming

  • BRUCE ASATO / DEC. 2019
                                U.S. Attorney Kenji Price announced today that his office is seeking forfeiture of two more properties involved in an illegal gambling operation.

    BRUCE ASATO / DEC. 2019

    U.S. Attorney Kenji Price announced today that his office is seeking forfeiture of two more properties involved in an illegal gambling operation.

The U.S. Attorney’s office for the District of Hawaii announced Tuesday it is seeking forfeiture of two more properties involved in an illegal gambling operation.

They are the residences of some of the individuals involved and include properties at 555 South St. and 2609 B Liliha St.

U.S. Attorney Kenji Price announced today an amended civil complaint was filed alleging the Liliha house contained 24 illegal gaming machines, gaming machine equipment, ledgers, work schedules and other documents related to the operation.

The South Street property is alleged to be forfeitable as it was allegedly purchased with illegal gambling proceeds.

Also at issue is $70,000 seized from bank accounts held by Seng Cheong Lio, Seng Long Lio, Shi Hua Huang and Shi Min Huang. These individuals and others have been allegedly involved since at least 2016 in the operation of at least nine illegal game rooms, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

The complaint alleges the money is subject to forfeiture as property used in the gambling operation, money laundering and structuring.

The original civil complaint sought the forfeiture of two single-family homes — one in a middle-class Pearl City neighborhood, and the other in a neighborhood of mostly walk-up apartment buildings.

The homes were allegedly used as illegal gambling rooms.

Price said on Sept. 17 that 12 people had been charged with the illegal gambling business at two game rooms.

He said “game rooms can bring violent crime and drugs to residential neighborhoods,” and vowed to continue to work with law enforcement partners to curtail their presence in the community.

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