comscore Column: Restoring Hawaii’s wetlands is caring for our history, culture
Editorial | Island Voices

Column: Restoring Hawaii’s wetlands is caring for our history, culture

  • STAR-ADVERTISER / 2014
                                A family of ‘alae ‘ula (Hawaiian moorhen) swim in the marsh at the Keawawa Wetland.

    STAR-ADVERTISER / 2014

    A family of ‘alae ‘ula (Hawaiian moorhen) swim in the marsh at the Keawawa Wetland.

  • Charles van Rees, Ph.D., is a conservation biologist and the advisory ecologist for Livable Hawaii Kai Hui.

    Charles van Rees, Ph.D., is a conservation biologist and the advisory ecologist for Livable Hawaii Kai Hui.

  • Martha Kawasaki is a researcher in waterbird ecology, ethnozoology and ethnobotany at the University of Hawaii-Hilo.

    Martha Kawasaki is a researcher in waterbird ecology, ethnozoology and ethnobotany at the University of Hawaii-Hilo.

Wetlands, where land and water meet, are among the most productive and important ecosystems on the planet, rivaling or exceeding tropical rainforests. Read more

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