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Kaimana Beach lures species of all sorts

  • JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                At top, a fisherman looked on as a sandbar shark’s dorsal fin broke the surface of the ocean while pursuing schools of baitfish at Kaimana Beach on Sept. 25. Lifeguards reported seeing several sharks pursuing schooling baitfish about 20 yards from the shoreline.

    JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM

    At top, a fisherman looked on as a sandbar shark’s dorsal fin broke the surface of the ocean while pursuing schools of baitfish at Kaimana Beach on Sept. 25. Lifeguards reported seeing several sharks pursuing schooling baitfish about 20 yards from the shoreline.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                A warning sign remained posted at Kaimana Beach on Tuesday as beachgoers went about their day.

    CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    A warning sign remained posted at Kaimana Beach on Tuesday as beachgoers went about their day.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Above, a sleeping seal at Kaimana Beach was seen on Tuesday.

    CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Above, a sleeping seal at Kaimana Beach was seen on Tuesday.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Fishermen using live bait waded out into the ocean Sept. 18 to catch halalu at Kaimana Beach. A shark was sighted offshore that day.

    CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Fishermen using live bait waded out into the ocean Sept. 18 to catch halalu at Kaimana Beach. A shark was sighted offshore that day.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Above, a fisherman holds a halalu, which is juvenille akule, also known as big eye scad.

    CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Above, a fisherman holds a halalu, which is juvenille akule, also known as big eye scad.

Almost daily since mid-September, shark warning signs have been posted by city lifeguards at Kaimana Beach because of white-tipped reef sharks swimming close to shore, feeding on schools of halalu (juvenile big eye scad). Read more

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