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Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree turns on, with virus rules

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                The 2020 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 75-foot tall Norway Spruce that was acquired in Oneonta, N.Y., is suspended by a crane as it’s prepared for setting on a platform at Rockefeller Center in New York on Nov. 14.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    The 2020 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 75-foot tall Norway Spruce that was acquired in Oneonta, N.Y., is suspended by a crane as it’s prepared for setting on a platform at Rockefeller Center in New York on Nov. 14.

NEW YORK >> Rockin’ around the Christmas tree is going to look different for visitors at Rockefeller Center this year, starting with Wednesday’s tree lighting ceremony.

What’s normally a chaotic, crowded tourist hotspot during the holiday season will instead be a mask-mandated, time-limited, socially distanced locale due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The tree, a 75-foot (23-meter) Norway spruce, is getting its holiday lights turned on in an event that will be broadcast on television but closed to the public. Among those scheduled for performances are Kelly Clarkson, Dolly Parton, and Earth, Wind & Fire.

In the days following the lighting until the early part of January, those wishing to take a look at the tree will have to follow a host of rules.

The plaza where the tree is physically located will be closed to the public; instead, there will be specific tree-viewing zones on the midtown Manhattan blocks on either side.

Visitors will join a virtual line, and can get text messages to let them know when it’s their turn. At that point, they will be directed to specific pods, each of which can hold four people, to look at the tree. There will be a five-minute limit to tree-viewing.

Of course, everyone will have to be wearing masks and maintain social distance. Entrance to the skating rink and retail will be separate.

The restricted approach is a necessary one, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said earlier this week. “It will be limited, the number of people that can get close. This is what we got to do to protect everyone.”

Workers at Rockefeller Center first put up a tree in 1931. It became an annual tradition starting in 1933. This year’s tree came from Oneonta, in central New York.

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