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Kneeling on George Floyd’s neck ‘totally unnecessary,’ lieutenant says

  • COURT TV VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS, POOL
                                Defense attorney Eric Nelson, left, and defendant, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin listened to testimony as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presided, today, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25 death of George Floyd.

    COURT TV VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS, POOL

    Defense attorney Eric Nelson, left, and defendant, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin listened to testimony as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presided, today, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25 death of George Floyd.

  • COURT TV VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS, POOL
                                Witness Lt. Richard Zimmerman of the Minneapolis Police Department, testified as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presided, today, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Chauvin is charged in the May 25 death of George Floyd.

    COURT TV VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS, POOL

    Witness Lt. Richard Zimmerman of the Minneapolis Police Department, testified as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presided, today, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Chauvin is charged in the May 25 death of George Floyd.

MINNEAPOLIS >> Kneeling on George Floyd‘s neck while he was handcuffed and in the prone position was “top-tier, deadly force” and “totally unnecessary,” the head of the Minneapolis Police Department’s homicide division testified today.

“If your knee is on a person’s neck, that can kill him,” said Lt. Richard Zimmerman, adding that when a person is handcuffed in the prone position, “your muscles are pulling back … and if you’re laying on your chest, that’s constricting your breathing even more.”

Zimmerman also testified at Derek Chauvin’s murder trial that once Floyd was handcuffed, he saw “no reason for why the officers felt they were in danger, if that’s what they felt, and that’s what they would have to feel to be able to use that kind of force.”

“So in your opinion, should that restraint have stopped once he was handcuffed and thrown on the ground?” Prosecutor Matthew Frank asked.

“Absolutely,” Zimmerman replied.

He also testified that officers have a duty to provide care for a person in distress, even if an ambulance has already been called.

Under cross-examination, Chauvin attorney Eric Nelson peppered Zimmerman with questions about use of force, pointing out that officers must consider the entire situation when deciding about whether to use force — including what is happening with a suspect, whether the suspect is under the influence, and other surrounding hazards, such as a crowd.

Zimmerman agreed with Nelson that a person who is handcuffed can still pose a threat and can continue to thrash around.

His testimony came a day after a Minneapolis police supervisory sergeant who was on duty the night Floyd died testified that he believes the officers restrained him for too long.

David Pleoger testified Thursday that officers are trained to roll people on their side to help with their breathing after they have been restrained in the prone position. He said the officers could have ended their restraint of Floyd after he stopped resisting.

Chauvin, 45 and white, is accused of killing Floyd by pinning his knee on the 46-year-old Black man’s neck for 9 minutes, 29 seconds, as he lay face-down in handcuffs. Floyd had been accused of passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a neighborhood market.

His death triggered large protests around the U.S., scattered violence and widespread soul-searching over racism and police brutality. The since-fired Chauvin is charged with murder and manslaughter, and most serious charge him carries up to 40 years in prison.

Minneapolis police Sgt. Jon Edwards, the overnight supervisor the night Floyd died, today said he secured the scene at the request of Pleoger, who was still at the hospital with Floyd. Edwards said Pleoger told him the encounter had the potential to become a “critical incident,” which could mean someone died or was seriously injured.

The defense has argued that Chauvin did what he was trained to do when he encountered Floyd last May and that Floyd’s death was caused not by the knee on his neck, as prosecutors contend but by drugs, his underlying health conditions and adrenaline. An autopsy found fentanyl and methamphetamine in his system.

On Thursday, two paramedics who arrived on the scene that day said they saw no signs that Floyd was breathing or moving. One of them, Derek Smith, testified that he checked for a pulse and couldn’t detect one: “In layman’s terms? I thought he was dead.”

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