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Weakening Hurricane Felicia and Tropical Storm Guillermo seen dissipating in Central Pacific

  • COURTESY NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
                                Hurricane Felicia’s five-day forecast as of 11 p.m. Sunday.

    COURTESY NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

    Hurricane Felicia’s five-day forecast as of 11 p.m. Sunday.

  • COURTESY NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
                                Tropical Storm Guillermo’s five-day forecast as of 11 p.m. Sunday.

    COURTESY NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

    Tropical Storm Guillermo’s five-day forecast as of 11 p.m. Sunday.

UPDATE: 11:15 p.m.

Felicia, a “very small hurricane” far off in the East Pacific, continued weakening as it moves west toward the Central Pacific, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

At around 11 p.m. Sunday, Felicia had maximum sustained winds of 100 mph, and was located 1,590 miles east-southeast of Hilo. Felicia was moving west at 12 mph.

Center officials said, “Felicia is a very small hurricane. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 10 miles from the center and tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles.”

By Friday, the end of the five-day forecast period, Felicia is expected to be a post-tropical remnant low with maximum winds of 30 mph or less as it passes hundreds of miles south of the Hawaiian islands.

The hurricane center is also watching Tropical Storm Guillermo with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph as of 11 p.m. Sunday and moving west at 15 mph, about 525 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

Tropical storm-force winds extend up to 115 miles from Guillermo’s center

“Gradual weakening is forecast during the next few days,” forecasters said.

Like Felicia, Guillermo is expected to weaken to a post-tropical remnant low, with winds of 25 mph, when it is in the Central Pacific on Friday.

Neither storm poses any threat to land.

5:05 p.m.

Two tropical cyclones churning harmlessly in the East Pacific are expected to weaken to tropical depressions when they reach the Central Pacific later this week.

Hurricane Felicia, which rapidly grew into a compact but powerful Category 4 storm late last week, is weakening just as quickly as it moves west over cooler waters.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said at about 5 p.m. the storm had maximum sustained winds of 110 mph, a Category 2 hurricane, and was located 1,651 miles east-southeast of Hilo.

The hurricane was moving west-northwest at 12 mph, but forecasters expect it to turn southwest as it nears the Central Pacific. Forecasters expect it to cross into the Central Pacific Tuesday night.

By Friday, the end of the five-day forecast period, Felicia is expected to be a post-tropical remnant low with maximum winds of 30 mph or less as it passes far south of the Hawaiian islands.

Felicia is a relatively small tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds of 75 mph or more extending 15 miles from the center and tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph or more extending 60 miles.

Farther east in the Pacific, Tropical Storm Guillermo had maximum sustained winds of 50 mph at 5 p.m. and was moving west at 15 mph, about 460 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

Tropical storm-force winds extend up to 115 miles from Guillermo’s center

“Gradual weakening is forecast to begin by Monday night and continue for several days thereafter,” forecasters said.

Like Felicia, Guillermo is expected to weaken to a post-tropical remnant low, with winds of 25 mph, when it enters the Central Pacific on Friday.

11 A.M.

Hurricane Felicia has weakened to a Category 3 storm as it approaches the central Pacific Ocean more than 1,250 miles east of Hilo this morning, and is expected to weaken more over the next few days.

As of 11 a.m. today, Felicia was located about 1,330 miles west-southwest of Baja California, according to forecasters from the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Felicia continues on west-northwest track at about 12 mph, but is expected to make a slight turn to the west later today or tonight, followed by a turn toward the west-southwest through Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 120 mph, with higher gusts. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the center of Felicia, with tropical-storm-force winds extending outward up to 60 miles.

According to NWS forecasters, this appears to be the steady weakening that was expected. Felicia faces less favorable conditions ahead, including cooler water temperatures and higher upper-level shear, which will negatively affect the storm’s intensity and stability as it begins to make a westward turn by Monday.

Felicia should weaken quickly by the time it enters the central Pacific, and is now forecast to become a remnant low by Thursday.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE

Hurricane Felicia remains a strong Category 4 hurricane this morning as it continues to travel westward across the eastern Pacific Ocean, more than 1,000 miles away from the main Hawaiian Islands.

As of 5 a.m., the center of Hurricane Felicia was located about 1,285 miles west-southwest from the southern tip of Baja California, moving west-northwest around 12 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Maximum sustained winds have decreased to about 130 mph with higher gusts, forecasters said. The storm is expected to turn more toward the west later by Monday, followed by a more south-southwestward track through Wednesday.

Some weakening of the storm is expected today, followed by faster weakening over the next few days. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the center of Felicia, with tropical-storm-force winds extending outward up to 60 miles.

According to the National Weather Service, some changes have been seen with Felicia during the past several hours. The small tropical cyclone’s previously very symmetric appearance has become distorted to the northeast, so the big question has become: Exactly when will this hurricane begin to dissipate?

With Felicia entering somewhat cooler waters and the potential for a slight increase in upper-level shear, forecasters currently expect significant weakening by Thursday.

In addition, Tropical Storm Guillermo has formed about 400 miles south-southwest of Baja California, and as of 5 a.m., was moving west-northwest at about 12 mph with maximum sustained winds of about 50 mph.

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