comscore Florida lifts 30-year ban on catching goliath grouper | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Florida lifts 30-year ban on catching goliath grouper

  • FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION VIA AP
                                In this undated photo provided by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is a goliath grouper. Florida is lifting its three-decade ban on catching and killing goliath groupers after wildlife officials argued their numbers have rebounded. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved on Wednesday, Oct. 6, a proposal to allow recreational harvest of 200 goliaths per year from March to May.

    FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION VIA AP

    In this undated photo provided by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is a goliath grouper. Florida is lifting its three-decade ban on catching and killing goliath groupers after wildlife officials argued their numbers have rebounded. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved on Wednesday, Oct. 6, a proposal to allow recreational harvest of 200 goliaths per year from March to May.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. >> Florida is lifting its three-decade ban on catching and killing goliath groupers after wildlife officials argued their numbers have rebounded.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved on Wednesday a proposal to allow recreational harvest of 200 goliaths per year from March to May. South Florida and the Florida Keys will be off-limits, and the size of the catch will be restricted to between 20 inches (51 centimeters) and 36 inches (91 centimeters).

The proposal is supported by fishing groups, and it calls for a lottery to issue licenses that allow each recipient to catch and kill one goliath.

The goliath almost died off in the 1980s from overfishing and pollution, and is not allowed to be caught in any other state or federal waters. Similar proposals have been under consideration for a few years.

Critics who oppose lifting the fishing ban argue that the fish’s numbers remain below historic levels and appear to be plateauing or decreasing. They say the species is also susceptible to mass die-offs.

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