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Firefighters contain Kalihi wild fire that threatened many homes

  • This video is about Kahauiki Last Char Fire-Day Four, Nov. 28, 2021

  • COURTESY HAWAII DLNR
                                The fire, called the Kahauiki Last Char fire, started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday and by Friday had moved to state lands. Between 10 and 21 firefighters and support staff have been responding since noon on Friday to the fire which is estimated to have charred about 50 acres.

    COURTESY HAWAII DLNR

    The fire, called the Kahauiki Last Char fire, started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday and by Friday had moved to state lands. Between 10 and 21 firefighters and support staff have been responding since noon on Friday to the fire which is estimated to have charred about 50 acres.

  • COURTESY HAWAII DLNR
                                The Kahauiki Last Char fire started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday, and by Friday had moved to state lands above Kalihi. Firefighters had the blaze under control by Sunday.

    COURTESY HAWAII DLNR

    The Kahauiki Last Char fire started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday, and by Friday had moved to state lands above Kalihi. Firefighters had the blaze under control by Sunday.

  • COURTESY HAWAII DLNR
                                The fire, called the Kahauiki Last Char fire, started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday and by Friday had moved to state lands. Between 10 and 21 firefighters and support staff have been responding since noon on Friday to the fire which is estimated to have charred about 50 acres.

    COURTESY HAWAII DLNR

    The fire, called the Kahauiki Last Char fire, started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday and by Friday had moved to state lands. Between 10 and 21 firefighters and support staff have been responding since noon on Friday to the fire which is estimated to have charred about 50 acres.

Firefighters from the state Division of Forestry and Wildlife say a wildfire that has been burning since Thanksgiving Day and posed a risk to hundreds of homes will soon be completely contained.

The blaze, called the Kahauiki Last Char fire, started on land below the Honolulu Forest Reserve on Thursday and by Friday had moved to state land.

Up to 21 firefighters and support staff have been responding since Friday to the fire which was estimated Sunday to have burned about 50 acres.

State Division of Forestry and Wildlife firefighters will be on fire watch Monday to ensure the fire has been extinguished.

Division of Forestry and Wildlife Incident Commander Jason Misaki said today that crews were putting water, by hand and by helicopter, on stubborn hot spots still burning or smoking in the ironwood-dominated forest.

The fire sped up the ridge behind the Kamehameha IV Apartments in Kalihi before crossing an access road to the other side, threatening hundreds of Fort Shafter homes.

“We are fortunate that there is a road at the top of the ridge,” Misaki said.

The road provided “relatively easy access” for equipment and personnel, he said.

Responders set up two portable water tanks which a contract helicopter and the Honolulu Fire Department’s Air One chopper used for water drops on hot spots.

Light rain also helped suppress the flames. Responders concentrated on looking for “smokers” and “hot spots,” using hand tools to dig in the soil and placing their hands near the ground to feel for heat. officials said.

Firefighters then strung waterlines through the forest so that they could douse trouble areas.

Misaki said this fire is a reminder of how quickly wildfire can break out and spread even in urban areas. Honolulu can be seen from much of the now charred ridge.

“Ten years ago, it was unusual for us to be fighting fire in November. Now we’re called out pretty much every month, so there’s no longer a set fire season,” he said.

Misaki said forest vegetation around most of Hawaii is really dry, and it will take significant winter rains to reduce the threat.

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