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Diane Moses turns broken pots into artful planters

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Board of Water Supply employee Diane Moses teaches a class at Halawa Xeriscape Garden on how to create layered planters with broken terra-cotta pots and plants that don't require lots of water.
  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
    How to make it. Step 5. Water roughly once a week; insert chopstick into soil to check for dampness.
  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
    How to make it. Step 4. Use a chopstick to poke holes in the soil to insert plants. Trailing succulents should be placed on the ends to help secure the potting mixture and sup- port other plants and decorations. Arrange larger plants last and fin- ish by adding moss, decorative gravel or other ac- cent pieces.
  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
    How to make it. Step 2. After placing a layer of bark at the bottom of the pot for drainage, arrange smaller terra-cotta or ce- ramic shards at various levels to hold potting mix and plants. If pieces won't stay in place, a hot-glue gun may be used to secure them.
  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
    How to make it. Step 3. Once broken pieces are secure, pack crevices with moistened potting soil. Smaller terra- cotta pots and saucers can be in- serted into the spaces to hold plants and decora- tions in place.
  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
    How to make it. Step 1. Use a paper napkin or newspaper to cover the large pot's drainage hole so water can still seep through.

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