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NEW YORK TIMES
                                Safe driving is possible for many people in their 70s, 80s and beyond, provided they take steps to maintain their skills.
Keeping older drivers protected on the roads

Highway safety experts have long been concerned about a possible epidemic of accidents and fatalities as people in their 70s, 80s and beyond continued to drive. The children of older drivers have worried along with them, sometimes going to extremes to commandeer the keys of their aging parents when reasoning fails to get them off the road. Read more

AP PHOTO/ELISE AMENDOLA, FILE
                                Pharmaceuticals are seen in North Andover, Mass.
There are some ways to help an overmedicated older parent

Dear Savvy Senior: My 75-year-old mother is currently taking 16 different prescription and over-the-counter medications, and I’m worried she’s taking way too many drugs. Can you suggest any resources that can help us? —Worried Daughter Read more

STAR-ADVERTISER
                                Service dog “Umi” is trained to gaze ride on his owner’s motorized scooter which enables them to safely enter the Handi-Van for transportation at Castle Medical Center in Kailua.
Medicare might fund mobility scooter — for in-home use

Dear Savvy Senior: I have arthritis in my hips and knees and have a difficult time getting around. What do I need to do to get a Medicare- covered electric-powered scooter or wheelchair? — Need a Ride Read more

NEW YORK TIMES
                                Masha Crawford, a nurse, tends to a patient on dialysis at Providence St. John’s Health Center in Los Angeles on Feb. 23, 2021.
Kidney disease overdiagnosed, study suggests

If the public has learned anything about medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is that science is constantly evolving. New findings can change how experts define a given illness, as well as how they diagnose, prevent and treat it. Read more

NEW YORK TIMES / OCT. 12
                                Dr. Helen Kao, right, palliative care doctor and medical director at Lumina Hospice & Palliative Care, adjusts 89-year-old Anne Cotton’s oxygen during a checkup in Cotton’s apartment in Corvallis, Ore. Lumina and other hospices that serve Benton County, Ore., are grappling with pandemic-fueled staff shortages, which have forced them at times to turn away new patients or delay their enrollment — as it did with Cotton.
Waitlisted for hospice care — ‘it’s devastating’

Anne Cotton had enjoyed her years at an assisted- living facility in Corvallis, Ore. But at 89 her health problems began to mount: heart failure, weakness from post-polio syndrome, a 30-pound weight loss in a year. Read more

DREAMSTIME / TNS
                                The Association of American Medical Colleges projects that by 2033, amid the growth of the senior population, there will be an unmet need for up to 55,200 primary care doctors.
Bidding adieu to a primary care doctor

I hadn’t expected the tears. My primary care doctor and I were saying goodbye after nearly 30 years together. “You are a kind and a good person,” he told me after the physical exam, as we wished each other good luck and good health. “I trust you completely — and always have,” I told him, my eyes overflowing. Read more

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Fathers with the kids in Waikiki.
Protect yourself against abdominal aortic aneurysms

Dear Savvy Senior: Can you tell me about stomach aneurysms? My father died from one about 10 years ago, and I’m wondering whether that can increase my risk of developing one myself. — Almost 60 Read more

NEW YORK TIMES / SEPT. 16
                                Opioid use by seniors makes them vulnerable to exploitation. At top, sisters Sue Peterson, top left, Kari Shaw, top right, and Pam Hultgren hold a photo of their mother, LaVonne Borsheim, at Borsheim’s assisted- living facility in Maple Grove, Minn.
Beware of drug diversion

LaVonne Borsheim’s family could not understand why she was suffering such intense pain. Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS / JUNE 26
                                It’s important for heart patients to continue exercising for heart health and mental health. Above, a masked woman practices tai chi in a relaxing green space in Bangkok.
COVID-19 can cause lasting problems for cardiac patients

Dr. Stanley Wang, a cardiologist at Austin Heart Central at the Heart Hospital of Austin, has been sending his patients the same message for months: If they get COVID- 19, they are among the highest-risk patients for severe disease and hospitalization. Read more

STAR-ADVERTISER
                                A woman enjoying one of her favorite pastimes, sitting on a park bench in the comfort of some large shade trees in Kapiolani Park.
Get financial assistance for aging-in-place improvements

Dear Savvy Senior: Do you know of any financial assistance programs that can help seniors with home improvement projects? I would like to help my grandparents make a few modifications to their house so they can continue living there safely, but money is tight. — Searching Grandson Read more

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
                                Casual relationships have several benefits, according to researchers who have studied them.
Acquaintances key to sense of belonging

In May, Vincent Keenan traveled from Chicago to Charlottesville, Va., for a wedding — his first trip out of town since the start of the pandemic. Read more

NEW YORK TIMES
                                Researchers have been studying how much care American adults will require as they age, and for how long. Above, Renee Turner, 37, stands behind her grandmother, Nancy Canu, 92, who has heart failure, in Rochester, Mich. Turner moved in with Canu five years ago to help take care of her.
Tallying the cost of growing older

Say you’re a 65-year-old looking ahead, wondering about your health and your finances, pondering what life might be like in 20 years. Read more

DREAMSTIME / TNS
                                Medication errors refer to mistakes in prescribing and dispensing medications. These errors injure hundreds of thousands of people every year in the U.S. Common causes of medication errors include drug names that sound alike, medications that look alike and medical abbreviations.
Reducing the risk of medication mistakes

Dear Mayo Clinic: My friend’s father recently died from a medication error. One of his prescriptions was filled incorrectly and caused a fatal reaction. I take multiple medications for various conditions. Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS
It’s smart to make an annual search for a better Medicare drug plan

Dear Savvy Senior: Is it important to compare Medicare Part D prescription drug plans every year? My pharmacist highly recommends it, but it’s such a hassle sorting through all those different plans. Is there an easier way to shop and compare Medicare drug plans? — Lazy Beneficiary Read more


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