Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Sunday, July 21, 2024 80° Today's Paper


Hawaii HighlightsTravel

Taro farm focuses on education, reconnecting to the land

1/6
Swipe or click to see more
ALYSSA AMASOL / AAMASOL@STARADVERTISER.COM
Kuuipo Garrido's father collects weeds that grow in the lo‘i kalo, or taro patch, at Na Mea Kupono.
2/6
Swipe or click to see more
ALYSSA AMASOL / AAMASOL@STARADVERTISER.COM
Garrido uses a table display to educate visitors on Hawaiian values, taro, kukui, lilikoi, apple banana and the birds who pose a big problem to the farm.
3/6
Swipe or click to see more
ALYSSA AMASOL / AAMASOL@STARADVERTISER.COM
The gazebo is a popular spot for visitors to sit and eat lunch at Na Mea Kupono.
4/6
Swipe or click to see more
ALYSSA AMASOL / AAMASOL@STARADVERTISER.COM
Kuuipo Garrido explains how fish provide nutrients for the plants to grow. "It's like aquaponics at a bigger level," she said.
5/6
Swipe or click to see more
ALYSSA AMASOL / AAMASOL@STARADVERTISER.COM
The punawai, or fresh water spring, is the most important feature on the land. It holds water that fell as rain 25 years ago as pipes draw out the mostly pure water to each taro patch.
6/6
Swipe or click to see more
ALYSSA AMASOL / AAMASOL@STARADVERTISER.COM
Na Mea Kupono is a six-acre wetland taro patch in Waialua.