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Hawaii's Backyard | Travel

Wonderland in Wahiawa

  • COURTESY NAOMI HOFFMAN

    The vivid summer-torch bromeliad (Billbergia pyramidalis), native to Brazil, blooms for only one week

  • COURTESY NAOMI HOFFMAN

    The vivid summer-torch bromeliad (Billbergia pyramidalis), native to Brazil, blooms for only one week

  • COURTESY NAOMI HOFFMAN

    A cascade of blue-green flowers falls from a jade vine (Strongylodon macrobotrys). This elegant climber from the Philippines is found near the entrance to Wahiawa Botanical Garden.

  • COURTESY NAOMI HOFFMAN

    A cascade of blue-green flowers falls from a jade vine (Strongylodon macrobotrys). This elegant climber from the Philippines is found near the entrance to Wahiawa Botanical Garden.

  • COURTESY NAOMI HOFFMAN

    The inner flower parts of the katmon tree (Dillenia philippinensis) seem to resemble a sea anenome.

  • COURTESY NAOMI HOFFMAN

    The inner flower parts of the katmon tree (Dillenia philippinensis) seem to resemble a sea anenome.

  • COURTESY HONOLULU BOTANICAL GARDENS

    A huge stand of yellow bamboo forms a canopy over a walkway in the Wahiawa Botanical Garden. More than 2,000 plants and trees representing 1,963 species thrive in the cool rainforest setting.

  • COURTESY HONOLULU BOTANICAL GARDENS

    A huge stand of yellow bamboo forms a canopy over a walkway in the Wahiawa Botanical Garden. More than 2,000 plants and trees representing 1,963 species thrive in the cool rainforest setting.

  • COURTESY JOSH SAND

    Naomi Hoffman, above, collect leaves from a ficus tree for an identification study at Wahiawa Botanical Garden.

  • COURTESY JOSH SAND

    Naomi Hoffman, above, collect leaves from a ficus tree for an identification study at Wahiawa Botanical Garden.

  • COURTESY JOSH SAND

    The pride of Burma tree (Amherstia nobilis), with its pink flowers, is widely cultivated but is probably extinct in the wild.

  • COURTESY JOSH SAND

    The pride of Burma tree (Amherstia nobilis), with its pink flowers, is widely cultivated but is probably extinct in the wild.

Wahiawa means “place of noise.” Long ago the rumble of rough seas supposedly could be heard from this area, which sits on a high plateau between the Waianae and Koolau mountain ranges in Central Oahu. Read more

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