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Old milk, new cheese: Salvage sour milk by turning it into ricotta

  • BRUCE ASATO / BASATO@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Homemade ricotta turns aging milk into a brand-new, versatile product that can add deliciousness to various foods, including savory pasta dishes and sweet cannoli desserts like this one.

  • PHOTO BY CRAIG T. KOJIMA

    1. Line a colander with porous cloth, to be used for straining the finished ricotta. Ronnie Nasuti uses a couple of Handi Wipes, but cheesecloth also works.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    2. Pour whole milk into a pot, turn the heat to medium, and as an option, season with salt.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    3. While some recipes call for the milk to be heated as high as 200 degrees, Nasuti takes his batch to 158 degrees.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    4. Acid, in this case lemon juice, added to the heated milk will cause it to curdle and form the curd solids.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    5. The milk begins to separate as soon as the acid is added. The curds rise to the top of the liquid whey.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    6. Though it’s easy to pour all the contents of the pot over the colander and cloth, Nasuti prefers to gently scoop out the curds.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    7. After draining for about 10 minutes, the homemade ricotta is still plenty moist, perfect to fill a cannoli or boost a pasta dish.

If there’s no use crying over spilled milk, there’s certainly no reason to do so over sour milk. Why? Read more

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