Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Tuesday, July 16, 2024 82° Today's Paper


Hawaii's BackyardTravel

The painstaking return of native plants to the 1,769-acre Mokio Preserve

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COURTESY BUTCH HAASE

Molokai High School students collect ohai seeds for propagation and future replanting in Mokio Preserve. Ohai (Sesbania tomentosa) is a federally listed endangered species.

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COURTESY BUTCH HAASE

Partners such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Coastal Program assist Molokai Land Trust in restoring and monitoring rare and common plants, birds and insects at Mokio Preserve. Pictured is Sheldon Plentovich, the coastal program’s coordinator.

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COURTESY BUTCH HAASE

After invasive species were removed and fences were erected to keep out axis deer, the endangered ‘ena’ena is naturally reseeding itself in the Anapuka Dune Restoration site. Wind-blown seeds come from remnant populations on 200- to 400-foot cliff faces above the ocean.

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COURTESY BUTCH HAASE

Molokai High School students dump weeds that were removed as part of Molokai Land Trust’s 60-acre Anapuka Dune Restoration project, which stretches along 3/4 of a mile of shoreline on Molokai’s northwestern coast.