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Exhibitions at Hawai‘i State Art Museum, Bishop Museum shed new light on Hawaii’s visual and performing artists

  • COURTESY HAWAI‘I STATE ART MUSEUM
                                Herb Kawainui Kane’s 1972 oil painting “Artist’s Interpretation of the Archaic Form of Voyaging Vessel (Eastern Polynesia)” with a backdrop by Hana Yoshihata created for the exhibition with acrylic and seawater.

    COURTESY HAWAI‘I STATE ART MUSEUM

    Herb Kawainui Kane’s 1972 oil painting “Artist’s Interpretation of the Archaic Form of Voyaging Vessel (Eastern Polynesia)” with a backdrop by Hana Yoshihata created for the exhibition with acrylic and seawater.

  • COURTESY HAWAI‘I STATE ARCHIVES
                                Members of Ernest Kaai’s Royal Hawaiian Troubadours in 1912.

    COURTESY HAWAI‘I STATE ARCHIVES

    Members of Ernest Kaai’s Royal Hawaiian Troubadours in 1912.

  • COURTESY HAWAI‘I STATE ART MUSEUM
                                From left are “Very Simple” (1975), wood sculpture, by Mark A. Chai, “Suntan #3” (2000), wood, by Pat Kaimoku Pine, “Puna” (2005), Italian marble,by Sean K. L. Browne, “Kualoa” (1989), raku pottery by Kauka de Silva, “Frond” (2011), decorated gourd, by Elroy Juan, “Ki‘i Poho Pohaku” (2015), carved vesicular basalt, by Henry Hanale Kila Hopfe and “Karafirumu I” (1990), filmstrips woven together, by Pam Barton.

    COURTESY HAWAI‘I STATE ART MUSEUM

    From left are “Very Simple” (1975), wood sculpture, by Mark A. Chai, “Suntan #3” (2000), wood, by Pat Kaimoku Pine, “Puna” (2005), Italian marble,by Sean K. L. Browne, “Kualoa” (1989), raku pottery by Kauka de Silva, “Frond” (2011), decorated gourd, by Elroy Juan, “Ki‘i Poho Pohaku” (2015), carved vesicular basalt, by Henry Hanale Kila Hopfe and “Karafirumu I” (1990), filmstrips woven together, by Pam Barton.

  • COURTESY BISHOP MUSEUM
                                Bishop Museum’s new exhibition “Kaula Piko: The Source of Strings” features a number of historic instruments and explores the impact of Hawaii musicians on the music of today.

    COURTESY BISHOP MUSEUM

    Bishop Museum’s new exhibition “Kaula Piko: The Source of Strings” features a number of historic instruments and explores the impact of Hawaii musicians on the music of today.

Shows and concerts may not be high on the list of activities you might want to do in this age of COVID-19, but now the Hawai‘i State Art Museum and Bishop Museum both have new exhibitions that will more than fulfill your needs for artistic inspiration and fulfillment, while also providing a new look at contributions of Native Hawaiian artists in particular. Read more

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