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Hawaii News

100-foot cinder cone left by Kilauea’s fissure 8 gets a name

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VIDEO BY STAR-ADVERTISER STAFF AND COURTESY USGS
Fissure 8, the most prominent vent during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea, has a new name: Ahu'aila'au.
U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                The Hawaii Board on Geographic Names announced its approval Thursday of Ahu‘aila‘au as the name for Kilauea’s fissure 8. The Hawaiian name refers to the altar of the volcano deity ‘Aila‘au. A view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that was building around fissure 8 in 2018 is seen above.
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U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

The Hawaii Board on Geographic Names announced its approval Thursday of Ahu‘aila‘au as the name for Kilauea’s fissure 8. The Hawaiian name refers to the altar of the volcano deity ‘Aila‘au. A view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that was building around fissure 8 in 2018 is seen above.

USGS / 2018
                                Fissure 8 at times was fountaining to heights of 200 feet and feeding a lava flow traveling to the northeast.
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USGS / 2018

Fissure 8 at times was fountaining to heights of 200 feet and feeding a lava flow traveling to the northeast.

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                A view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that was building around fissure 8 in 2018 is seen above.
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U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

A view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that was building around fissure 8 in 2018 is seen above.

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                The Hawaii Board on Geographic Names announced its approval Thursday of Ahu‘aila‘au as the name for Kilauea’s fissure 8. The Hawaiian name refers to the altar of the volcano deity ‘Aila‘au. A view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that was building around fissure 8 in 2018 is seen above.
USGS / 2018
                                Fissure 8 at times was fountaining to heights of 200 feet and feeding a lava flow traveling to the northeast.
U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                A view of the cinder-and-spatter cone that was building around fissure 8 in 2018 is seen above.
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