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Public-private partnerships have a troubled history in Hawaii

  • JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                The Aloha Stadium redevlopment plan would make the 98-acre site available under a 99-year lease to a developer or developers that would produce a new stadium surrounded by other development such as housing and retail. Pictured here is the stadium in January.

    JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM

    The Aloha Stadium redevlopment plan would make much of the stadium’s 98-acre site available under a 99-year lease to a developer that would produce development such as housing, retail, restaurants and hotels in what would be called the New Aloha Stadium Entertainment District. The stadium is seen here in January.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                In December, after receiving bids that were more than $1 billion higher than anticipated, the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation dropped its years-long effort to secure a P3 to build the last pieces of the system and run it for 30 years.

    CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    In December, after receiving bids that were more than $1 billion higher than anticipated, the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation dropped its years-long effort to secure a P3 to build the last pieces of the system and run it for 30 years.

  • COURTESY RENDERING
                                Kewalo Harbor: In 1998, the Hawaii Community Development Authority board selected a $138 million plan by local businessman D.G. “Andy” Anderson for an entertainment complex that included a Ferris wheel, laser-light tower, concert shell, restaurants and shops. The P3 project was later killed over perceived risky financial projections.

    COURTESY RENDERING

    Kewalo Harbor: In 1998, the Hawaii Community Development Authority board selected a $138 million plan by local businessman D.G. “Andy” Anderson for an entertainment complex that included a Ferris wheel, laser-light tower, concert shell, restaurants and shops. The P3 project was later killed over perceived risky financial projections.

  • GEORGE F. LEE / GLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Nohona Hale: The 111-unit low-income rental apartment tower in Kakaako that opened last year is considered a P3 success for the HCDA.

    GEORGE F. LEE / GLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Nohona Hale: The 111-unit low-income rental apartment tower in Kakaako that opened last year is considered a P3 success for the HCDA.

  • COURTESY RENDERING
                                690 Pohukaina: The HCDA partnered with Ohio-based Forest City Enterprises to build a pair of towers with 804 largely market-rate rental apartments on state land in Kakaako in 2012. The deal fell apart after a negotiation impasse partly related to the push to include a school in the project.

    COURTESY RENDERING

    690 Pohukaina: The HCDA partnered with Ohio-based Forest City Enterprises to build a pair of towers with 804 largely market-rate rental apartments on state land in Kakaako in 2012. The deal fell apart after a negotiation impasse partly related to the push to include a school in the project.

Many state leaders view so-called P3 arrangements as attractive for having the private sector bear the risk and expense of major real estate projects with public purposes in return for rights to develop public land for an expected profit. The reality, however, is that this strategy has a hit-or-miss record locally. Read more

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