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An $83.8 million program could help Hawaii residents who lost homes in 2018 Kilauea eruption

  • RONIT FAHL / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
                                Leilani Estates resident Robert Golden, 77, scanned the bleak lavascape surrounding the still-smoldering Fissure 8, now officially renamed Ahu‘aila‘au.

    RONIT FAHL / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Leilani Estates resident Robert Golden, 77, scanned the bleak lavascape surrounding the still-smoldering Fissure 8, now officially renamed Ahu‘aila‘au.

  • CHRISTIE WILSON / CWILSON@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Libbie Kaahu-Evans, left, and Dolores Nakamoto, once neighbors in Leilani Estates before abandoning their homes to the May 2018 eruption, now share a rental in Hawaiian Paradise Park, where they chatted in the carport Thursday.

    CHRISTIE WILSON / CWILSON@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Libbie Kaahu-Evans, left, and Dolores Nakamoto, once neighbors in Leilani Estates before abandoning their homes to the May 2018 eruption, now share a rental in Hawaiian Paradise Park, where they chatted in the carport Thursday.

  • COURTESY MATTHIAS MOYLAN
                                A fire-resistant foundation helped save a home in Pohoiki after lava overran the macadamia nut farm owned by Matthias Moylan’s grandparents. They have since relocated to Waiakea near Hilo.

    COURTESY MATTHIAS MOYLAN

    A fire-resistant foundation helped save a home in Pohoiki after lava overran the macadamia nut farm owned by Matthias Moylan’s grandparents. They have since relocated to Waiakea near Hilo.

  • RONIT FAHL / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
                                Howard Konanui, 66, stood in front of his former home on Moku Street on Wednesday as he described the sights and sounds of the eruption that began May 3, 2018.

    RONIT FAHL / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Howard Konanui, 66, stood in front of his former home on Moku Street on Wednesday as he described the sights and sounds of the eruption that began May 3, 2018.

  • RONIT FAHL / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
                                Three years after the 2018 Lower Puna eruption, steam and sulfurous gases continue to emanate from Leilani Estates. A sign seen Thursday attests to the disasters that have struck the region in recent years.

    RONIT FAHL / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Three years after the 2018 Lower Puna eruption, steam and sulfurous gases continue to emanate from Leilani Estates. A sign seen Thursday attests to the disasters that have struck the region in recent years.

  • GEORGE F. LEE / GLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Fissure 8 in Leilani Estates, recently renamed Ahu‘aila‘au, generated 260-foot-high fountains and produced two-thirds of the lava that flowed seaward over the course of the 2018 eruption in Lower Puna.

    GEORGE F. LEE / GLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Fissure 8 in Leilani Estates, recently renamed Ahu‘aila‘au, generated 260-foot-high fountains and produced two-thirds of the lava that flowed seaward over the course of the 2018 eruption in Lower Puna.

  • TIM WRIGHT / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
                                Lava burned a swath of destruction through the lower section of the rural subdivision, claiming numerous properties in 2018.

    TIM WRIGHT / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

    Lava burned a swath of destruction through the lower section of the rural subdivision, claiming numerous properties in 2018.

Three years after magma from Kilauea Volcano burst through the ground in Leilani Estates, signaling the start of the historic 2018 eruption, the sights, smells and sounds of the disaster are still vivid to those most impacted by it. Read more

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