comscore Study by Hawaii researchers suggests expansion of taro farming could help save endangered Hawaiian stilts | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Hawaii News

Study by Hawaii researchers suggests expansion of taro farming could help save endangered Hawaiian stilts

  • STAR-ADVERTISER FILE
                                A new study indicates that restoring wetland taro fields in certain areas in the state could increase Hawaiian stilt habitat by 171%. The stilts, known as aeo in Hawaiian, are one of four endangered waterbird species found in Kawainui Marsh.

    STAR-ADVERTISER FILE

    A new study indicates that restoring wetland taro fields in certain areas in the state could increase Hawaiian stilt habitat by 171%. The stilts, known as aeo in Hawaiian, are one of four endangered waterbird species found in Kawainui Marsh.

  • STAR-ADVERTISER FILE
                                A new study indicates that restoring wetland taro fields in certain areas in the state could increase Hawaiian stilt habitat by 171%. The stilts, known as aeo in Hawaiian, are one of four endangered waterbird species found in Kawainui Marsh.

    STAR-ADVERTISER FILE

    A new study indicates that restoring wetland taro fields in certain areas in the state could increase Hawaiian stilt habitat by 171%. The stilts, known as aeo in Hawaiian, are one of four endangered waterbird species found in Kawainui Marsh.

While the number of endangered Hawaiian stilts, or aeo, has been on the rise in recent decades, the long-term outlook for the species is much more uncertain as sea level rise threatens to wipe out much of its best coastal habitat. Read more

Scroll Up