comscore Hawaii’s terminally ill challenged by limited access, lack of participating doctors while seeking medical aid in dying | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Hawaii News

Hawaii’s terminally ill challenged by limited access, lack of participating doctors while seeking medical aid in dying

  • STAR-ADVERTISER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION
                                Hawaii’s well-documented physician shortage, especially on the neighbor islands, is contributing to the difficulty patients face in finding doctors who will handle medical-aid-in-dying cases, officials said.

    STAR-ADVERTISER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

    Hawaii’s well-documented physician shortage, especially on the neighbor islands, is contributing to the difficulty patients face in finding doctors who will handle medical-aid-in-dying cases, officials said.

  • STAR-ADVERTISER / 2018
                                Gov. David Ige signs House Bill 2739, the Our Care, Our Choice Act, which allows terminally ill patients to seek medical aid in dying. To the right of Ige is lobbyist John Radcliffe, who was instrumental in securing passage of the law. Radcliffe, who suffered from colon cancer, ended his life Aug. 11, 2020, with prescribed medication.

    STAR-ADVERTISER / 2018

    Gov. David Ige signs House Bill 2739, the Our Care, Our Choice Act, which allows terminally ill patients to seek medical aid in dying. To the right of Ige is lobbyist John Radcliffe, who was instrumental in securing passage of the law. Radcliffe, who suffered from colon cancer, ended his life Aug. 11, 2020, with prescribed medication.

Two years after Hawaii’s medical-aid-­in-dying law went into effect, it’s still a challenge for many terminally ill patients to find physicians willing to help, according to health officials, and a significant number don’t survive the mandatory 20-day waiting period, the longest of any state with similar laws. Read more

Scroll Up