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Coast Guard navigates bureaucracy in fight against illegal fishing

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Fijian law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane conduct an inspection of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Fijian law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane conduct an inspection of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Crew members of CGC Harriet Lane and Fijian law enforcement officials aboard as “ship riders” gather on the Lane’s bridge for a mission briefing as they prepare to board a Chinese-operated fishing vessel in Fijian waters.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Crew members of CGC Harriet Lane and Fijian law enforcement officials aboard as “ship riders” gather on the Lane’s bridge for a mission briefing as they prepare to board a Chinese-operated fishing vessel in Fijian waters.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane and Samoan authrorities conduct an inspection of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel that was in Samoan waters.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane and Samoan authrorities conduct an inspection of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel that was in Samoan waters.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Cpl. Jack Dennison, a Mandarin-linguist in the U.S. Marines, acts as an interpreter for a member of the Samoa Police Force during a boarding of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel by Samoan authorities and the U.S. Coast Guard. Language barriers and a shortage of interpreters have made investigating fishery violations at sea a challenge.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Cpl. Jack Dennison, a Mandarin-linguist in the U.S. Marines, acts as an interpreter for a member of the Samoa Police Force during a boarding of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel by Samoan authorities and the U.S. Coast Guard. Language barriers and a shortage of interpreters have made investigating fishery violations at sea a challenge.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Petty Officer 3rd Class Dylan Rourke unloads and does a safety check on his weapon after returning to the Harriet Lane from a fishery boarding in Samoan waters.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Petty Officer 3rd Class Dylan Rourke unloads and does a safety check on his weapon after returning to the Harriet Lane from a fishery boarding in Samoan waters.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Samoan law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane return to the ship after an inspection of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel that was in Samoan waters.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Samoan law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane return to the ship after an inspection of a Chinese-operated fishing vessel that was in Samoan waters.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Crew members aboard a Chinese-flagged longliner fishing in Fijian waters throw out a line with bait as Fijian law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane board the ship to look for potential violations.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Crew members aboard a Chinese-flagged longliner fishing in Fijian waters throw out a line with bait as Fijian law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen assigned to the CGC Harriet Lane board the ship to look for potential violations.

  • KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Fijian law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen conduct an inspection aboard a Chinese-operated fishing vessel.

    KEVIN KNODELL / KKNODELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Fijian law enforcement officials and U.S. Coast Guardsmen conduct an inspection aboard a Chinese-operated fishing vessel.

Competition over dwindling fish resources has led to international tensions, and in some cases clashes in places like the South China Sea, once one of the world’s most plentiful fishing grounds that has now been depleted almost to collapse. Read more

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