Norman continues to move northwest toward the islands
  • Sunday, November 18, 2018
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Norman continues to move northwest toward the islands

  • CENTRAL PACIFIC HURRICANE CENTER

    The forecast track for Hurricane Olivia as of 11 p.m. Hawaii time today.

  • CENTRAL PACIFIC HURRICANE CENTER

    The forecast track for Hurricane Norman as of 11 p.m. today.

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UPDATE: 11 p.m.

Norman remains a Category 3 hurricane heading toward the west-northwest near 8 mph.

At last check, Norman was about 345 miles east of Hilo and about 525 miles east of Honolulu.

“Norman is forecast to continue to move toward the northwest on Friday and Saturday, and along the forecast track, the center of Norman is expected to pass 200 to 300 miles to the northeast of the main Hawaiian Islands,” forecasters said.

Maximum sustained winds are near 120 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles.

Meanwhile, Olivia has become a little stronger but still remains a Category 2 hurricane.

At last check, Olivia was about 1,910 miles east of Hilo and about 2,095 miles east-southeast of Honolulu.

“Olivia is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph, and this motion with some increase in forward speed is expected during the next couple of days,” forecasters said. “A gradual turn toward the west is expected over the weekend.”

Maximum sustained winds have increased to near 105 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles.

5:20 p.m.

Hurricane Norman took a predicted turn to the west-northwest this afternoon, but remains a dangerous Category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph, forecasters said.

At 5 p.m., the storm was about 385 miles east of Hilo and 570 miles east of Honolulu, moving west-northwest at 9 mph.

“This motion is expected to continue tonight, followed by a northwestward motion on Thursday and Friday,” Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasters said this evening. The movement was a predicted change from the last few days when Norman was moving west toward the Hawaiian islands.

“On the forecast track, the center of Norman will pass 200 to 300 miles to the northeast of the main Hawaiian Islands on Thursday and Friday,” forecasters said. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, but Norman is expected to remain a hurricane through Friday, they added.

Hurricane-force winds extend out 30 miles from the center and tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles.

Norman is generating large swells that forecasters say will spread from east to west across the islands over the next couple of days. “Large and potentially dangerous surf produced by these swells is expected along east-facing shores through Thursday night,” they said. Eastern shores of most islands remain under high surf warnings.

Norman is expected to pass northeast of the islands, weakening from a hurricane to a tropical depression by Sunday when it is forecast to be hundreds of miles north of Kauai.

“It should be noted that none of the reliable guidance suggests direct impacts from Norman on the main Hawaiian islands,” meteorologists with the Honolulu-based hurricane center said. “However, as the tropical cyclone will be in our general vicinity for the next couple of days, people should continue to monitor the progress of this system.”

Further out in the Eastern Pacific, Hurricane Olivia was a Category 2 storm, with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph, and moving west-northwest at 14 mph. At about 5 p.m., Olivia was about 1,735 miles east-southeast of Hilo, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Hurricane-force winds extend out 25 miles from Olivia’s center and tropical storm-force winds extend 115 miles.

Some slight weakening is forecast during the next few days, forecasters said and Olivia is expected to weaken to a tropical storm by this weekend as it crosses into the Central Pacific. At the end of the five-day forecast period early next week, Olivia is expected to still be a tropical storm a few hundred miles northeast of Hilo.

11 a.m.

Weather officials expect Norman — still a major hurricane — to turn to the northwest tonight.

Category 3 Hurricane Norman, with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph, was about 435 miles east of Hilo and 625 miles east of Honolulu and headed west at 8 mph at 11 a.m. today, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

This general motion is expected to continue today, with a turn toward the northwest tonight and Thursday. On the forecast track, the center of Norman is expected to pass northeast of the main Hawaiian Islands starting later Thursday. Hurricane-force winds extend up to 30 miles from the center and tropical storm-force winds extend 115 miles out.

“Interests in the main Hawaiian islands should monitor the progress of Norman over the next couple of days,” forecasters said.

Some fluctuations in intensity are possible today, followed by gradual weakening from tonight through Thursday night. Norman is expected to remain a hurricane through Thursday, then weaken to a tropical storm. By the end of the five-day forecast period, the storm is expected to dissipate to a remnant hundreds of miles north of Kauai.

High surf warnings for eastern shores of most of the Hawaiian islands are in effect due to Norman. “A large swell from Hurricane Norman will rise today, and peak Thursday along east facing shores of the Big Island, Maui, Molokai, Oahu and Kauai,” the National Weather Service said.

Meanwhile, further east, Hurricane Olivia continues to weaken as it heads west-northwestward.

Located about 1,800 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Olivia clocked in with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph while heading west-northwest at 13 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami, which monitors the Eastern Pacific. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from Olivia’s center and tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles.

Additional slow weakening is expected during the next few days, and it is expected to cross into the Central Pacific Saturday as a tropical storm. A gradual turn toward the west is expected over the weekend.

By Monday, at the end of the five-day forecast period, Olivia is projected to be about 400 miles northeast of the Big Island with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph.

8:30 a.m.

A high surf warning is in effect for the east shores of most islands as Norman approaches Hawaii.

A large swell from Norman will rise today and peak Thursday along east-facing shores of the Big Island, Maui, Molokai, Oahu and Kauai, the National Weather Service said in a bulletin.

Surf up to 10 feet is expected along the east shores of Oahu, Molokai and Kauai shores, rising to 12 feet tonight and 15 feet Thursday. The east shores of the Big Island and Maui, meanwhile, could see surf up to 15 feet today, building to 18 feet tonight and Thursday.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE

Norman strengthened to a major hurricane overnight as it continues on a track west toward the Hawaiian Islands.

Packing maximum sustained winds of 115 mph, Norman was about 480 miles east of Hilo and 670 miles east of Honolulu and heading west at 12 mph at 5 a.m. today, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

This general motion is expected to continue through this morning. Norman is expected to slow its forward motion slightly, and turn toward the west-northwest later today and tonight. A turn toward the northwest is expected Thursday and Thursday night.

Norman is now a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some fluctuations in intensity are possible today, followed by gradual weakening from tonight through Thursday night. Norman is expected to remain a hurricane through Thursday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from Norman’s center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles.

Meanwhile, further east, Olivia weakened to a Category 2 hurricane although it is still headed west toward Hawaii.

Located about 2,152 miles east of Hilo, Olivia was packing maximum sustained winds of 110 mph and headed west at 13 mph, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

This motion is expected to continue today. A turn toward the west-northwest is expected tonight, followed by a gradual turn back toward the west over the weekend.

Additional slow weakening is expected during the next few days.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from Olivia’s center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles.

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