• Thursday, September 20, 2018
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Live Well

3 ways Social Security benefits can grow after retirement

  • HAWAII TRIBUNE HERALD

    The Social Security Office at Prince Kuhio Plaza on Hawaii island. Once you begin receiving Social Security benefits, there are three common ways benefit checks can increase: a cost of living adjustment (COLA); additional work; or an adjustment at full retirement age if you received reduced benefits and exceeded the earnings limit.

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You made the choice and now you are happily retired. You filed online for your Social Security benefits. They arrive each month in the amount you expect. But, did you ever wonder if your Social Security check could increase?

Once you begin receiving benefits, there are three common ways benefit checks can increase: a cost of living adjustment (COLA); additional work; or an adjustment at full retirement age if you received reduced benefits and exceeded the earnings limit.

The cost of living adjustment is the most commonly known increase for Social Security payments. We annually announce an adjustment, and there’s usually an increase in the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit amount people receive each month.

By law, federal benefit rates increase when the cost of living rises, as measured by the Department of Labor’s Consumer Price Index (CPI-W). More than 66 million Americans saw a 2.0 percent increase in their Social Security and SSI benefits in 2018. For more information on the 2018 COLA, visit socialsecurity.gov/cola.

Social Security uses your highest 35 years of earnings to figure your payment when you sign up for benefits.

If you work after you begin receiving benefits, your additional earnings may increase your payment. If you had fewer than 35 years of earnings when we figured your benefit, you will replace a zero earnings year with new earnings.

If you had 35 years or more, Social Security will check to see if your new year of earnings is higher than the lowest of the 35 years (after considering indexing).

Social Security checks additional earnings each year you work while receiving Social Security. If an increase is due, you will receive a notice and a one-time check for the increase and your continuing payment will be higher.

Maybe you chose to receive reduced Social Security retirement benefits while continuing to work.

You made the choice to take benefits early, but at a reduced rate. If you exceeded the allowable earnings limit and had some of your benefits withheld, Social Security will adjust your benefit once you reach full retirement age.

Social Security will refigure your payment to credit you for any months you did not receive payments. Your monthly benefit will increase based on the crediting months you receive. You can find additional information about working and your benefit at socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10077.pdf.


Nicole Tiggemann is a spokeswoman for the Social Security Administration.


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