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Pouring of Blackened Canteen WWII relic helps heal U.S.-Japanese rifts

  • Video by Craig T. Kojima and William Cole / ckojima@staradvertiser.com, wcole@staradvertiser.com

    The Blackened Canteen ceremony is a way for American and Japanese military members and observers to extend a hand of continued friendship, peace and reconciliation by pouring whiskey into Pearl Harbor as an offering to the fallen.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Daniel Martinez, left, National Park Service chief historian, was overwhelmed when given a replica of the Blackened Canteen by Dr. Sugano.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Dr. Hiroya Sugano, middle, who has kept the Blackened Canteen tradition going, poured whiskey into Pearl Harbor on Thursday with retired Air Force Col. Edwin Hawkins Jr., left, executive director for Honolulu’s Office of Economic Development, and Koichi Ito, Consul General of Japan in Honolulu.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    The Blackened Canteen was on display before the ceremony.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Koichi Ito, left, consul general of Japan in Honolulu, Dr. Hiroya Sugano and retired Air Force Col. Edwin Hawkins Jr., executive director of the Honolulu Office of Economic Development, prepare to pour whiskey from the WWII relic at the Arizona Memorial.

For 26 years a U.S canteen blackened and battered in the midair collision of two B-29 bombers in Japan during World War II has been an instrument of peace and reconciliation at Pearl Harbor. Read more

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