August 28, 2016 | 76° | Check Traffic

Top News

Convention center will remove shroud from controversial mural

  • PHOTO BY DENNIS ODA.  SEPT. 19,20130919-2158 CTY CENSORED MURAL
The mural "Forgotten Inheritance" by artist Hans Ladislaus is still covered by a black curtain.  The name plate above the garbage can on the right is also covered up in black.  The mural measures 10 feet by 25 feet and is made of concrete, plaster and bronze.  It shows the Hawaiian Islands and what looks like a ladder in the middle of it and bones in the sand on the right panel.  It is next to 316C Maui Room, Level 3 on the Main Concourse of the Convention Center.  PHOTO BY DENNIS ODA.  SEPT. 19, 2013.
    PHOTO BY DENNIS ODA. SEPT. 19,
    20130919-2158 CTY CENSORED MURAL The mural "Forgotten Inheritance" by artist Hans Ladislaus is still covered by a black curtain. The name plate above the garbage can on the right is also covered up in black. The mural measures 10 feet by 25 feet and is made of concrete, plaster and bronze. It shows the Hawaiian Islands and what looks like a ladder in the middle of it and bones in the sand on the right panel. It is next to 316C Maui Room, Level 3 on the Main Concourse of the Convention Center. PHOTO BY DENNIS ODA. SEPT. 19, 2013.

The mural, “Forgotten Inheritance,” by Hans Ladislaus will be unveiled again for public viewing at the Hawai’i Convention Center after having been shrouded in black cloth since Sept. 4.

Hawaii Tourism Authority President Mike McCartney had ordered the public artwork draped in deference to objections from some native Hawaiians who found the depiction of bones in the sand at the edge of the mural to be offensive.

But his decision provoked more controversy than the mural itself. In a written statement Thursday afternoon, McCartney did not indicate when the covering would be removed. 

“After a series of productive meetings with all the involved parties, the HTA is pleased to announce that a mutual understanding has been reached which will allow the piece by Hans Ladislaus to be put back on display at the Hawaii Convention Center,” the statement said. 

“This mutual agreement was based on sincere mutual respect between the involved parties and includes continuing discussions with the involved parties to further their understanding and appreciation of the various perspectives raised during this process.”

The artwork had been on display since the convention center was completed 16 years ago. The 10-by-25-foot sculpture is an abstract panorama incorporating a map of the island chain and various symbols, including at its far edge, stylized images of bones in sand. It was made of concrete, plaster and brass.

Ladislaus said the artwork was designed to reflect his concern that Hawaii’s people are losing touch with their heritage.

No comments
By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. Because only subscribers are allowed to comment, we have your personal information and are able to contact you. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, email commentfeedback@staradvertiser.com.