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Hawaii man was source of National Security Agency leaks

By William Cole

POSTED:
LAST UPDATED: 03:47 p.m. HST, Jun 09, 2013


The man who revealed the existence of two top-secret National Security Agency surveillance programs gathered some of the information at his workplace in Hawaii before leaving several weeks ago for Hong Kong, two newspapers reported.

The Guardian newspaper identified Edward Snowden, 29, as the source of the leaks, which have touched off the latest national debate over secret government monitoring of Americans' activities.

"I am not going to hide," the Washington Post quoted Snowden as saying. "Allowing the U.S. government to intimidate its people with threats of retaliation for revealing wrongdoing is contrary to the public interest."

Snowden said claims the programs are secure are not true.

"Any analyst at any time can target anyone. Any selector. Anywhere. Where those communications will be picked up depends on the range of those sensor networks and the authority that that analyst is empowered with," Snowden said, in accompanying video on the Guardian's website. "Not all analysts have the power to target anything. But I, sitting at my desk, had the authority to wiretap anyone, from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if I had a personal email."

The Post said Snowden wanted to step out of the shadows as the source of the information, and that he plans to seek asylum from any countries "that believe in free speech."

Snowden was a former technical assistant for the CIA, but more recently worked for the NSA as a contractor with Booz Allen Hamilton, the Guardian reported.

The newspaper said he had "a very comfortable life" with a salary of about $200,000 and a home in Hawaii that he shared with a girlfriend.

At the NSA office in Hawaii where he worked, he copied the last set of documents he planned to disclose, the Guardian said.

A Hawaii real estate agent saId Snowden and his girlfriend moved out of their home in Waipahu on May 1, leaving nothing behind.

Century 21 real estate agent Kerri Jo Heim said that police came by on Wednesday to ask where the couple went. Heim told them she didn't know.

NSA and other authorities have twice visited his home in Hawaii and contacted his girlfriend, the Guardian reported.

"I feel satisfied that this was all worth it. I have no regrets," Snowden told the Guardian.

The Guardian and Post both wrote explosive stories about the existence of the government surveillance programs, including the revelation that Verizon provided phone user information to the government and the use of a program called PRISM that tracks Internet use.

Snowden told the Guardian that he lacked a high school diploma and enlisted in the U.S. Army until he was discharged with broken legs after a training mission.

After leaving the Army, Snowden got his foot in the door with the NSA at a covert facility at the University of Maryland, working as a security guard.

He later went to work for the CIA as an information technology employee and by 2007 was stationed in Geneva, Switzerland, where he had access to classified documents.

During that time, he considered going public with what he knew about the nation's secretive programs. He decided against it, he told the newspaper, because he did not want to put anyone in danger and he hoped Obama's election would curtail some of the clandestine programs.

He said he was disappointed that Obama did not rein in the surveillance programs.

"Much of what I saw in Geneva really disillusioned me about how my government functions and what its impact is in the world," he said. "I realized that I was part of something that was doing far more harm than good."

The Guardian said Snowden has been monitoring news coverage of the leaks and asked to be identified after several days of interviews.

"I have no intention of hiding who I am because I know I have done nothing wrong," Snowden is quoted as saying.

Snowden could face decades in a U.S. jail for revealing classified information if he is successfully extradited from Hong Kong, said Mark Zaid, a national security lawyer who represents whistleblowers. Hong Kong has an extradition treaty with the United States that took force in 1998, according to the U.S. State Department website.

"If it's a straight leak of classified information, the government could subject him to a 10 or 20 year penalty for each count," with each document leaked considered a separate charge, Zaid said.

Snowden told the Guardian he believes the government could try to charge him with treason under the Espionage Act, but Zaid said that would require the government to prove he had intent to betray the United States, whereas he publicly made it clear he did this to spur debate.

The government could also make an argument that the NSA leaks have aided the enemy — as military prosecutors have claimed against Army Pvt. Bradley Manning, who faces life in prison under military law if convicted for releasing a trove of classified documents through Wikileaks.

"They could say the revelation of the (NSA) programs could instruct people to change tactics," Zaid said. But even under the lesser charges of simply revealing classified information, "you are talking potentially decades in jail, loss of his employment and his security clearance."

Officials said the revelations were dangerous and irresponsible. House intelligence committee member Peter King, R-NY, called for Snowden to be "extradited from Hong Kong immediately...and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law," in an interview with The Associated Press.

"I believe the leaker has done extreme damage to the U.S. and to our intelligence operations," King said, by alerting al-Qaida to U.S. surveillance, and by spooking U.S. service providers who now might fight sharing data in future with the U.S. government, now that the system has been made public.

King added that intelligence and law enforcement professionals he'd spoken to since the news broke were also concerned that Snowden might be taken into custody by Chinese intelligence agents and questioned about CIA and NSA spies and policies.

"To be a whistleblower, there would have to be a pattern of him filing complaints through appropriate channels to his supervisors," said Ambassador John Negroponte, the first director of national intelligence, in an interview with the AP today. "For me, it's just an outright case of betrayal of confidences and a violation of his nondisclosure agreement."

President Barack Obama, Clapper and others have said the programs are authorized by Congress and subject to strict supervision of a secret court.

"It's important to recognize that you can't have 100 percent security and also then have 100 percent privacy and zero inconvenience," Obama said. "We're going to have to make some choices as a society."

_____

The Associated Press contributed to this story.







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allie wrote:
Yikes! Where is the Hawaii NSA office anyway?
on June 9,2013 | 10:31AM
localguy wrote:
If we tell you we have to kill you. It is a secret. heheheh
on June 9,2013 | 10:50AM
allie wrote:
yikes! But anyway, did anyone really not know that the NSA was doign things like this. After Israel got you to fight their wars under Bush, you all begged for security at any price.
on June 9,2013 | 11:55AM
nj24 wrote:
@ allie: What part of the USS Cole being attacked killing our Sailors, our embassies (2) in Africa, not to mention 9/11 attack in NYC, the Pentagon and the failed crash in PA. I can also mention the bombing of the Marine barracks in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. We have been attacked for decades once in awhile we need to fight back. Nothing to do with Israel.
on June 9,2013 | 03:34PM
el_burro_sabio wrote:
No shame, tell Allie all you know.
on June 9,2013 | 03:17PM
Mythman wrote:
Ah Ha, the all knowing Allie doesn't have a clue. Imagine, there are "worlds" within worlds, within worlds, within worlds, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc..........
on June 9,2013 | 10:58AM
allie wrote:
I will bike up to the Wahiawa building to explore things...
on June 9,2013 | 11:55AM
false wrote:
Wahiawa doesn't have a room for you and no bike lanes either.
on June 9,2013 | 02:09PM
dufus wrote:
Moved from Kunia tunnel to $315 Million facility at NCTAMS, Wahiawa....
on June 9,2013 | 11:08AM
allie wrote:
yikes..scary!
on June 9,2013 | 11:51AM
stingray65 wrote:
allie is now being watch and tapping her phone.
on June 9,2013 | 05:33PM
Hugo wrote:
Which one? The administrative office or the technical office? The Maui high-speed telescope office? Maui computer center ofice? Maui "internet 2" office. I could go on.
on June 9,2013 | 11:14AM
Leonidas69 wrote:
HRSOC - Hawaii Regional Security Operations Centre. One of five such NSA facilities.
on June 9,2013 | 11:22AM
allie wrote:
As a Mandan huntress, I can easily sneak up on these facilities. NY Times reports Snowden was a high school drop out. How on earth does a guy like this get to be cleared for security? silly
on June 9,2013 | 12:06PM
aomohoa wrote:
What a wonderful little dream world you live in. LOL
on June 9,2013 | 02:14PM
stingray65 wrote:
Because he is expendable!!
on June 9,2013 | 05:34PM
stingray65 wrote:
allie, you do not have the need to know!
on June 9,2013 | 05:31PM
atilter wrote:
if any citizen has done nothing wrong to harm anyone else, subvert the government (like he did), lied, cheated, stolen, maimed, beyond the pale of personal religion/morality, then he/she has nothing to fear in the way of goverment reprisals from any detailed scrutiny into their on-line activities!!! if they did anything ON-LINE, then their stupidity is obvious. ONLY those that do or have done anything mentioned above have anything to worry about. think about it...the average "joe" is not "into" any of those things...trifles are merely that, trifles - if anyone is worried, then they might truly have some skeletons to worry about! if not, why worry?
on June 9,2013 | 10:34AM
ya_think wrote:
So if your so willing to be an open book why don't you use your real name when commenting on this site? Answer is because you like your privacy. I don't understand people who are willing to give up their fourth amendment rights or any of their right under the Constitution. You have no idea how much this government spies own it own people, do you really believe what they are tell us?
on June 9,2013 | 10:57AM
buttery wrote:
You are so right on!
on June 9,2013 | 11:43AM
hikine wrote:
I agree with ya_think. The government can always manipulate informations to target an individual. My question is with all these informations gathered there's still a lot of so called terroristic threats. How many terrorists has been caught? What else is the government doing with these datas?
on June 9,2013 | 02:21PM
JayDeeL wrote:
You think this is bad, you should have experienced our privacy, or lack thereof, during WWII, when our very existence depended on security. Maybe you did live during that time and remember "Loose Lips, Sink Ships". We were at war then, we are at war now! Try telling the people in New York or Boston otherwise.
on June 9,2013 | 03:06PM
HD36 wrote:
And did the NSA stop it?
on June 9,2013 | 04:18PM
Manoa2 wrote:
This is why we need the ACLU. In the guise of fighting terrorism, we have given up principles of constitional rights and due process, Guantanamo, eavesdropping, interfering with internal affairs of other countries, then tried to hind these things as secrets.
on June 9,2013 | 11:29AM
busterb wrote:
We need the ACLU as much as the Kardashians.
on June 9,2013 | 01:21PM
Manoa2 wrote:
If you were an American Muslim or a legal resident Muslim targeted by this spying or an zamericsn supporting legal Muslim groups or reading Al Jazeera, you would feel differently.
on June 9,2013 | 01:53PM
busterb wrote:
Muslims like Kimmy K?
on June 9,2013 | 07:26PM
pechanga wrote:
Agree, Manoa2
on June 10,2013 | 01:56PM
pechanga wrote:
Agree..(.hide) these things as secrets....
on June 10,2013 | 01:54PM
iwanaknow wrote:
So..................some will call Edward a traitor and others will call him a hero. The plot thickens. Sounds like a book or movie in the making?
on June 9,2013 | 10:36AM
Mythman wrote:
Doesn't matter what "some" say - it matters what laws are broken and in this guys case, he broke laws. Everyone in his position gets this urge once in a while when one's personal life crosses with one's biz or prof life, and that is when disclipline and integrity come into the picture. Anyway, it's all so compartmentalized that no one jerk can really blow the whole scene. He might be clueless except for his little compartment......
on June 9,2013 | 11:00AM
postmanx wrote:
What about the government breaking the laws of the Constitution of the United States of America. The Right to Privacy is a pretty big deal to many people. Edward is definitely a hero and deserves the Nobel Peace Price much more so the Obama.
on June 9,2013 | 03:52PM
HD36 wrote:
Yes. And he said if he really wanted to make money or harm the government he could have shut down all the info gathering stations around the world in half an hour and sold a list of NSA empoyees to Russia.
on June 9,2013 | 04:20PM
Manoa2 wrote:
What information will he have to give the Chinese and the Russians to keep from getting extradited by the United States? This is information that could harm us. One of the reasons for a right to privacy-- now the world knows our secrets.
on June 10,2013 | 02:34AM
Skyler wrote:
The New Bradley Manning™
on June 9,2013 | 11:43AM
false wrote:
Sounds like the "Condor" got away again.
on June 9,2013 | 02:11PM
cojef wrote:
Wow! Earning $200,000 annually in Hawaii is like heaven on earth. All down the drain, cuz he has a conscience or morals? Did someone offer him more to spy and things was getting too hot for him, to be exposed, so he blew the whistle to throw a monkey wrench in the investigation. After all, he worked for the CIA, so he has the smarts to know how things stand with his position in the midst of the intrigue. A good plot for a book.
on June 9,2013 | 10:39AM
RichardCory wrote:
A good plot for a book? This is just one of the most depressingly imbecilic things I have ever read on this website. The saddest part is that there are so many people like you who fail to see the big picture here. You will never truly understand the heroism Snowden has demonstrated, and you will never understand the ramifications of what is really going on here. This is just another idle newsworthy tidbit for you to mull over for a second, smirk over what little entertainment you've derived from it, and then never think about the matter again. Just go back to watching the Big Bang Theory and American Idol, or whatever other vacuous brain-destroying dead space that fills the airwaves these days.
on June 9,2013 | 10:45AM
BluesBreaker wrote:
Amen.
on June 9,2013 | 10:58AM
allie wrote:
I quite agree and have said so for ages. I just get blasted for it. But outsiders do see things...
on June 9,2013 | 11:53AM
aomohoa wrote:
So you finally admit that you have been around "for ages?" Many people believe you are an old man pretending to be a Mandan Huntress. What other personalities might be living in that sick mind of yours? LOL
on June 9,2013 | 02:16PM
allie wrote:
every year in Hawaii is an age hon. But not to worry. I have one job offer already in the Tribal Admin. I graduate and leave in December.
on June 9,2013 | 02:30PM
NanakuliBoss wrote:
Thank You Akua!
on June 9,2013 | 06:24PM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
Ah but will you be saying the same thing when the US is attacked again from within by terrorists that use the internet to organize, plan and carry out their attacks? I doubt it! The NSA is not interested in listening to the average american's phone calls or email but they do need the right to investigate those that are affiliated with terrorists organizations. Do you know how many muslims live in the US??? I'm not saying all muslims are terrorists but all the terrorists do seem to be muslim. Just a coincidence? I doubt that too.
on June 9,2013 | 12:17PM
false wrote:
No but this has already been a movie with the Twin Towers in it and then the movie was real and Towers are gone. We need to pay attention to heroes before the movie version rises.
on June 9,2013 | 02:13PM
HD36 wrote:
Yes. His motivation was to let the American People know what going on so we can decide wether or not we want to go down this road. A road where data is stored on Amrican Citizens for decades. Data that tracks phone records, friends, credit cards use etc. Hold the wrong political view and you get a target on your back.
on June 9,2013 | 04:23PM
pechanga wrote:
Agree!
on June 10,2013 | 02:00PM
2Lolo wrote:
Hilarious! but SO TRUE!
on June 11,2013 | 08:24AM
john_zee wrote:
"conscience or morals" or a 29 year old that thinks he has all the answers
on June 9,2013 | 11:20AM
cojef wrote:
Never thought there are real red blooded Americans in our midst. Why all the rage. Did my comments offend you. I have 2 hitches in the Army and a WWII veteran to boot. Honorably discharged from the service. So there, happy!
on June 9,2013 | 11:37AM
IAmSane wrote:
He was talking about Mr. Snowden.
on June 9,2013 | 12:25PM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
I think he belongs in jail with the wikileaks guy. Both of them have compromised our nation's security by revealing government secrets. It's treason period, not his place to decide what is right or wrong. We elect people to make those decisions for us.
on June 9,2013 | 12:22PM
postmanx wrote:
Right, and our election process is so fair. It's not like the guy with the most money wins most of the time, actually he wins all of the time.
on June 9,2013 | 03:56PM
NanakuliBoss wrote:
What else is new. U.S.Seals write books, assist in game making Internet programs, etc.etc. No loyalty. Then this guy is labelled a "whistle blower"?
on June 9,2013 | 06:23PM
Leonidas69 wrote:
So according to the Guardian, He said he had gone to Hong Kong because of its "strong tradition of free speech". Not sure if he knows that Hong Kong is now part of China who has a sterling reputation for free speech rights.
on June 9,2013 | 10:44AM
buttery wrote:
He went to Hong Kong as an American Spy!
on June 9,2013 | 11:46AM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
That's exactly why he went there, the chinese won't expel him. He obviously doesn't want to stay there though which is why he's hoping there are other countries who believe in his "free speech" rights.
on June 9,2013 | 12:25PM
false wrote:
Where ever he went, he can't count on a lot of protection or value. He's not high on the information chain and his clearances won't work anymore. How much worth does he have to a foreign entity? Unless this is a cover to get him into a covert operation. That's a twist.
on June 9,2013 | 02:16PM
stingray65 wrote:
Bingo!!
on June 9,2013 | 05:43PM
HD36 wrote:
He said he could have sold secrets to the Russians if he wanted. Hong Kong has a CIA office a few block from where he's staying and they have an extradition treaty with the US. He fully expects to be picked up by the CIA and extradited if they don't execute him by paying off the Triads.
on June 9,2013 | 04:29PM
lajekal wrote:
The Chinese will take him into custody and interrogate him. He'll find out that the Chinese have no constitution regarding free speech.
on June 9,2013 | 10:30PM
HD36 wrote:
As he said in his interview: Hong Kong has many demonstrations against the government and they are left alone by mainland China. Hong Kong doesn't have its internet filtered like China.
on June 9,2013 | 04:27PM
stingray65 wrote:
The whole episode is just a smoke screen.. china will pick him up and offer him three times of what is making with the NSA. Double agent.
on June 9,2013 | 05:42PM
DTM622 wrote:
This article states "Hawaii man". It appears that he resided in Hawaii but did not originate from Hawaii. When there is a misnomer like the title of this article it irks me.
on June 9,2013 | 10:49AM
Leonidas69 wrote:
I agree! He is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina. He does not have roots in the Aloha State.
on June 9,2013 | 11:06AM
Skyler wrote:
They didn't call him "Hawaiian" or "local" and afaik, it's common to say, "(State) resident (man or woman)" in the media.
on June 9,2013 | 11:47AM
allie wrote:
true..but the same is true of Obama hon
on June 9,2013 | 11:53AM
busterb wrote:
Or allie for that sake.
on June 9,2013 | 01:22PM
allie wrote:
well..I never claimed I was from here. I am native American and prefer my ancestral lands.
on June 9,2013 | 02:31PM
stingray65 wrote:
From Oklahoma or Arkansas?
on June 9,2013 | 05:46PM
NanakuliBoss wrote:
Shibai on ancestral lands. All land is the United States of America. You said it.
on June 9,2013 | 06:27PM
sailfish1 wrote:
Do you know that you keep calling people "hon"? Is that a native American trait? I only experienced the term when I spoke to elderly southern women.
on June 9,2013 | 08:42PM
Ronin006 wrote:
The SA has been noticeably silent about the Obama administration scandals making national and international news like the IRS targeting of conservative non-profit groups, like the targeting of AP and Fox News supposedly to discover the source of leaked classified information and the Benghazi cover-up investigation. The only reason this story made the SA is that it has a Hawaii connection.
on June 9,2013 | 10:55AM
localguy wrote:
NSA really caused this problem not Edward Snowden. The NSA willfully allowed their low budget contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, to gain access to top secret government information, copy it, and just walk out the door. Would appear there was no physical security plan, training, or competent security manager in place to protect these documents. No protection against using a photo copier or to bring in a device like a cell phone, take photos, convert to PDF, and walk out the door. Looks like the NSA is run by a bunch of keystone cops to let this happen under the watch. You know they are all hunkering down, trying to spin their failure a thousand ways, not their fault. NSA has lost credibility, vote of no confidence. Just a bunch of dysfunctional, overpaid, government bureaucrats. Your tax dollars at work.
on June 9,2013 | 10:55AM
john_zee wrote:
BAH low budget? since when?
on June 9,2013 | 11:21AM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
Gotta agree ..... this guy doesn't have a high school diploma but was making 200K a year?? The NSA just learned an important lesson I think.
on June 9,2013 | 12:28PM
localguy wrote:
NSA really caused this problem not Edward Snowden. The NSA willfully allowed their low budget contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, to gain access to top secret government information, copy it, and just walk out the door. Would appear there was no physical security plan, training, or competent security manager in place to protect these documents. No protection against using a photo copier or to bring in a device like a cell phone, take photos, convert to PDF, and walk out the door. Looks like the NSA is run by a bunch of keystone cops to let this happen under the watch. You know they are all hunkering down, trying to spin their failure a thousand ways, not their fault. NSA has lost credibility, vote of no confidence. Just a bunch of dysfunctional, overpaid, government bureaucrats. Your tax dollars at work.
on June 9,2013 | 10:56AM
localguy wrote:
NSA really caused this problem not Edward Snowden. The NSA willfully allowed their low budget contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, to gain access to top secret government information, copy it, and just walk out the door. Would appear there was no physical security plan, training, or capable security manager in place to protect these documents. No protection against using a photo copier or to bring in a device like a cell phone, take photos, convert to PDF, and walk out the door. Looks like the NSA is run by a bunch of keystone cops to let this happen under the watch. You know they are all hunkering down, trying to spin their failure a thousand ways, not their fault. NSA has lost credibility, vote of no confidence. Just a bunch of dysfunctional, overpaid, government bureaucrats. Your tax dollars at work.
on June 9,2013 | 10:57AM
BluesBreaker wrote:
Good for Snowden. He's extraordinarily brave. He's given up a cushy job, become an expatriot and put himself on the Obama administration's list of leakers to be prosecuted so that we could learn what our government is doing to us, with our tax dollars. We owe him a huge debt of gratitude for exposing this reprehensible breach of privacy and civil liberties. Long live the Fourth Amendment!
on June 9,2013 | 10:57AM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
We'll see what you say after the next terrorist attack.
on June 9,2013 | 12:31PM
bikemom wrote:
How far are you willing to go in the name of "security"?
on June 9,2013 | 12:51PM
Meleana22 wrote:
You mean like the one that just happened at the Boston Marathon DESPITE Russia warning the U.S. about the perpetrators terrorist ties...?
on June 9,2013 | 02:59PM
HD36 wrote:
The NSA was formed after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
on June 9,2013 | 03:05PM
BluesBreaker wrote:
The odds of a terrorist attack are extremely unlikely. I'll take my chances if it means protecting my privacy, or what's left of it. The Obama administration and the Washington elite of both parties who have a hand-in-glove relationship with the defense and security contractors will try to fabricate a case that these revelations have grave public safety implications (like your post) and have done terrible damage to our security, there's really not a shred of evidence that anything has been compromised except the reputations of the security establishment and the politicians who do their bidding.

They were caught violating our Fourth Amendment protections and exposed for the anti-democratic crypto totalitarians they are. If these programs are allowed to continue, we won't be a democracy much longer. We've already seen how this administration and its DOJ use government to punish and intimidate those that oppose it. It will only get worse with every succeeding administration, Democrat or Republican.

The other culpable party is the media who are owned by large corporations, like NBC (which is owned by defense contractor GE). They have a stake in seeing existing arrangements continue, and it already shows in their reporting of the NSA scandal. A report by CNN on the Snowden interview was completely stacked with pro-security state guests and the anchor's questions were along the lines of "Isn't this the most damaging breach of security ever?" Of course, he didn't bother to offer any evidence for the presumptions in his questions.


on June 9,2013 | 04:00PM
HD36 wrote:
You read my mind. Was John McCain on? Nicely put.
on June 9,2013 | 09:02PM
pechanga wrote:
Agree!
on June 10,2013 | 02:10PM
pechanga wrote:
Agree!
on June 10,2013 | 02:08PM
ceria wrote:
Some things just shouldn't be blabbed.......ask any military personnel. It could put people in danger......this has been going on for over 10 years. Why give the "other side" an advantage. He left the country.....does he think he's going to fare better, especially when US citizens are not as welcomed as they used to be around the world? Why does everything have to be transparent?
on June 9,2013 | 11:03AM
BluesBreaker wrote:
"Some things just shouldn't be blabbed . . ." On the contrary, wrongdoing by the federal government and violations of the Fourth Amendment should be made known to the American people for whom these agencies ostensibly work (if we're actually a democracy). I'm sure Snowden's decision to go to Hong Kong to avoid persecution (and prosecution) was not made lightly. I believe most people who have followed this issue had a good idea this was happening. Earlier this year, Amnesty International sued the CIA (Amnesty International v. Clapper) for the mass collection of phone records.

As Snowden told the Guardian, "I carefully evaluated every single document I disclosed to ensure that each was legitimately in the public interest," he told The Guardian. "There are all sorts of documents that would have made a big impact that I didn't turn over, because harming people isn't my goal. Transparency is."


on June 9,2013 | 11:22AM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
He outed the program .... damage done!
on June 9,2013 | 12:32PM
BluesBreaker wrote:
You mean Fourth Amendment violators exposed.
on June 9,2013 | 04:01PM
Mythman wrote:
No comment
on June 9,2013 | 11:05AM
Hugo wrote:
The Advertiser covered this story around 2004 when Verizon built a new switching facility in rapidly expanding Kaka'ako. It got out that during construction of the facility the government installed "always on", self-powered phone taps. The government promised not to use the taps without a warrant. Sure! The Advertiser story followed the San Francisco Chronicle story about the same taps being installed at the local telephone switching facility located at 611 Folsom Street. About 2005 the Advertiser reported that local residents had brought suit against Hawaiian Telephone about these taps. Rachel Maddow, last Friday, did a lengthy and in-depth report on these stories. I am not surprised that the Star-Advertiser has not mentioned their own reporting about this.
on June 9,2013 | 11:11AM
allie wrote:
well it is the SA hon...you cannot expect any real journalism
on June 9,2013 | 12:05PM
aomohoa wrote:
Do they have real journalism in ND? LOL
on June 9,2013 | 02:18PM
allie wrote:
lots
on June 9,2013 | 02:31PM
IAmSane wrote:
What, you've never heard of the world-regarded The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead?
on June 9,2013 | 03:30PM
Leonidas69 wrote:
So it seems Mr Snowden is not a government employee. He was a contractor. See his employer's statement below. Booz Allen Hamilton, Edward Snowden's employer, has released a statement saying that Snowden "has been an employee of our firm for less than 3 months" and calling news reports "shocking": June 9, 2013 Booz Allen can confirm that Edward Snowden, 29, has been an employee of our firm for less than 3 months, assigned to a team in Hawaii. News reports that this individual has claimed to have leaked classified information are shocking, and if accurate, this action represents a grave violation of the code of conduct and core values of our firm. We will work closely with our clients and authorities in their investigation of this matter.
on June 9,2013 | 11:28AM
kennysmith wrote:
we are going to here a lot more about our gov. we are getting sick of the way there doing thing to the people of the usa.
on June 9,2013 | 11:47AM
localpoi wrote:
Security guard with no high school diploma, then moved his way up to access classified documents?
on June 9,2013 | 12:11PM
saywhatyouthink wrote:
I know .... sheez, it's like they asked for it.
on June 9,2013 | 12:39PM
pechanga wrote:
Many very intelligent people may not have traditional diplomas....however, they often go on to earn their GED certifications.
on June 10,2013 | 02:15PM
stevedryden wrote:
In reference to the quote at the end of this article by Rep Mike Rogers = his wife, Kristi Clemens Rogers, was previously President and CEO of Aegis LLC, a contractor to the United States Department of State for intelligence-based security services. In other words, they make big money spying on people. Check him out on wiki.... In the beginning of the internet communication system, I was hopeful that it would be a tool to liberate people from government tyranny on a global level, But, it has become clear that "big brother" is using this tool to create the real version of 1984. If you think you have any privacy on the computer, you are "dead" wrong. Some of you might be aware how the US stole Hawaii, well now they are stealing their own country from their own people. This is the sickness called AmeriKKKa. I use my real name here, so NSA, come get me....I'd rather be dead than in your prison of hell.....You can have the IRS audit me for starters......
on June 9,2013 | 12:29PM
pechanga wrote:
Oy vey, Steve! You very brave.... I agree with you on many statements.... Bless you, Steve...and...good luck! Gird your loins.... Keep a copy of your posts as evidence that merely stating your opinions may threaten to send you straight to the deep dark vortex of misinformation and injustice of Gulag ...
on June 10,2013 | 02:29PM
stevedryden wrote:
CIA and NSA has a secret station on Midway Atoll, so they can hide their spy operations from the public....
on June 9,2013 | 12:34PM
kuroiwaj wrote:
Mahalo Mr. Snowden, you're a true American. Good luck and God Bless.
on June 9,2013 | 12:40PM
jrboi96786 wrote:
sometimes, the only way to do is not the right way. i understand why people are so iffy about this issues but you can't trust anyone. i mean anyone can be a terrorist, you don't have to be a muslim. or a spy for Chinese government, you don't have to be Chinese to be one. i would not be surprise if one of the politician is a spy for some foreign government. all you need is money and you can infiltrate anything. i'm not worry about the government monitoring my phone calls. there are millions of American that uses phones and interment, i really don't think that they have someone for each person listening to every words you say or write. i think they are looking for some certain consistent words and phone/email coming from and to traffic. i mean if someone keeps mentioning "bombs, murder, terrorist, al-quida, nuclear bomb, etc." once a day or week, then may be there's something going on. or phone calls, emails coming from russia, china, afghanistan, iran, etc. to united states every day or week, they i think i would take a closer look on that. this is what i hate about our society... is when the government is doing everything for it's people, people don't like it. and then when the government doesn't do anything and something happen, we blame the government for not doing enough. people are stupid.
on June 9,2013 | 12:43PM
pechanga wrote:
Don't agree! I personally used to believe it!
on June 10,2013 | 02:35PM
pueouhane wrote:
Tell me, where this lolo clown going hide? And who is he saving and from what? Truth and honesty ended the minute he closed his good book and walked out of the church.
on June 9,2013 | 12:44PM
roofustherhino wrote:
Come on. We're a small town. Someone reading this has to have met Edward and his girlfriend in a social setting. Dish it out.
on June 9,2013 | 12:48PM
toad103410 wrote:
I applaud the guy for having a conscience and the guts to expose the fact that the government is spying on its own people even though it may have had no proof that any crimes were being committed. If this guy is telling the truth he gave up a lot with not much to gain, except possibly prosecution from the government. Doesn't sound like he gave any national security secrets away. BTY I do have some experience in this field. Was in the USAFSS (and had a top secret crypto clearance). We listened in on voice communications and intercepted Morse and electronic signals of both our then enemies and allies and reported to NSA among other customers.
on June 9,2013 | 01:01PM
pechanga wrote:
Boogeymen abusing whistleblowers to maintain absolute silence.....
on June 10,2013 | 02:38PM
bwaikiki wrote:
Letting Americans know radically their privacy has been invaded is good. It's not nearly as destructive as Obama and Biden revealing so much information, to pat themselves on the back, over bin Laden's death. Otherwise, Seal Team 6 would not have been targeted and killed, not to mention the Paki doctor being revealed and imprisoned.. All that surveillance did not reveal the Boston bombers, even when Russian pointed out their names. Only after the fact did they decide the e-mails were significant. Instead they will harass Internet shoppers who buy the wrong thing, like ammo.
on June 9,2013 | 01:05PM
hikine wrote:
I applaud him for leaking these covert ops that targets the very people they supposedly try to protect. With hackers at work these personal informations are still vulnerable. No guarantee the government can protect these collected data from hackers.
on June 9,2013 | 02:25PM
pcman wrote:
Edward Snowden thinks he is real smart by tipping off all our enemies and making the NSA programs more expensive to fix check and operate. Undoubtedly, Snowden should go to jail for life, Life sentences are only proper because it could deter other maintainers of TOP SECRET clearances from illegal actions.
on June 9,2013 | 02:40PM
toad103410 wrote:
What is he tipping off all our enemies about? That we are spying on our own citizens? Don't see how that jeopardizes our national security.
on June 9,2013 | 03:22PM
HD36 wrote:
That's true toad. He wants to let the public decide wether to go down this road or not.
on June 9,2013 | 04:15PM
sailfish1 wrote:
Some of our own citizens are our enemies. The smart and connected "citizen-enemies", of course, hide themselves well and will not be found out by U.S. "spying on our own citizens".
on June 9,2013 | 08:37PM
eastsidegrrrl wrote:
So great to see someone with true courage in this day and age.
on June 9,2013 | 02:45PM
toad103410 wrote:
My thoughts exactly!
on June 9,2013 | 03:28PM
sailfish1 wrote:
Yes it does take courage to throw your life away.
on June 9,2013 | 08:39PM
BillD wrote:
Ron Paul lunatic releases 7 year old information and everyone gets all excited. I can't wait for his next leak....Manning carries the Colts to victory over the Bears for a Super Bowl win. He went to China? Let him rot.
on June 9,2013 | 02:59PM
toad103410 wrote:
What the heck are you trying to say?
on June 9,2013 | 03:28PM
BillD wrote:
I'm saying who the heck didn't know this information 7 years ago when the story first broke? Right after the Patriot Act took effect this exact same information was released. Is anyone surprised over this? Really? Or is this just an convenient platform for the people who are always mad to be mad again. Old news, and the guy gave money to that maniac Ron Paul the last two cycles.
on June 9,2013 | 04:03PM
BluesBreaker wrote:
This information was never publicly stated previously. The public didn't know about PRISM or Boundless Informant. That's the reason a federal judge ruled against Amnesty International in Amnesty International v. Clapper (CIA). The judge said there was no proof or documentation that such programs existed and therefore the plaintiffs couldn't claim they might be affected by any supposed surveillance. I think we now know everyone is affected if they use any electronic communications device, from a cell phone to a computer to a credit card swipe.
on June 9,2013 | 07:54PM
HD36 wrote:
If you watch his interview just released, his primary purpose of whistle blowing, is that he wants the people to decide wether or not they want information stored on them for years. Information on what credit cards, websites, friends, e-mails, everything you do off the computer or phones, stored for years. He said the data storage bases are getting exponentially bigger. His concern is that anyone can be made to look like a threat from years of data collection. As policies change, you could be considered a threat for criticizing government spending. He gave up a 200k a year job, in which he said he had to do little work, because he wants the people to know what's going on and for the people to decide if this is the road you want to go down.
on June 9,2013 | 03:55PM
sak wrote:
As stated in the movie, "Enemy of the State" with Gene Hackman and Will Smith, "Who will be monitoring the monitor who monitors the monitor"?
on June 9,2013 | 04:15PM
HD36 wrote:
That's exactly why he came out in public. He wants the public to decide.
on June 9,2013 | 04:32PM
localgirl2 wrote:
More power to the people and less to the govt who has no business poking it's nose into innocent peoples everyday lives. Most of the American people are ordinary working stiffs who just want to live peacefully. Maybe it's time to go back to flip phones and and writing by mail through the post office. Oh, they sure lost a bucket full in the past year. We really need them don't we?!
on June 9,2013 | 06:44PM
ahi1pfb wrote:
Bush started this, but Barry expanded this to keep tabs on his political enemies. Never trust government no matter the political party.
on June 9,2013 | 07:22PM
HD36 wrote:
Esjpecially when both sides get their campaign contributions from the same source.
on June 9,2013 | 09:07PM
wn wrote:
First of all,we only know what is posted and broadcasted in the media. Has a rather interesting bio...did not graduate from high school, earned a medical discharge (?), worked his way up after being hired as a security guard being paid a $200,00 year year...did the NSA conduct a background check...is this for real...sounds a bit suspect to me... Second, I don't appreciate it when then refer to a transplant who simply resides in Hawaii as a "Hawaii Man", so he resides in Hawaii and is considered a Native / local "Hawaii Man"...I don't think so. Not much information about where he was raised and mentored into what he is or is not. Lastly, we now have a new head of the NSA...Susan Rice...interesting chain of events...
on June 9,2013 | 07:24PM
Anonymous wrote:
I hereby declare that most of the posters here, on both sides, have now qualified for the new Olympic sport: jumping to conclusions.
on June 9,2013 | 07:32PM
ahi1pfb wrote:
With the track record that's coming out no need jump, you can trip over it.lol.
on June 9,2013 | 08:12PM
pechanga wrote:
Love that comment, Anonymous! :)
on June 10,2013 | 02:44PM
sailfish1 wrote:
What is the big "secret" he revealed? Anyone with any smarts already knew that the government spies on their own people. In fact, the governments in all major countries of the world do the same. How do you think they managed to arrest people who had plans of causing mass destruction? The real question now is do we want privacy or do we want security? Remember, the good honest people have nothing to hide.
on June 9,2013 | 08:49PM
HD36 wrote:
Yea but I went 6 miles over the speed limit coming home tonight.
on June 9,2013 | 09:10PM
scooters wrote:
NSA needs to do better on screening their employees. Another "communist infiltrator" slipped through and now has betrayed us. Hang'em high!
on June 9,2013 | 09:42PM
Shotzy wrote:
If he really,truly did this to spark debate and get this out in the open for scrutiny, we owe this guy our respect and praise. It takes some big kahona's to do what he did. In time we will get the facts.
on June 10,2013 | 06:24AM
pechanga wrote:
Agree!
on June 10,2013 | 02:46PM
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