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Wednesday, April 01, 2015         

New York Times

In Indiana, the Republican mayor of Indianapolis argued against the law the Republican governor had signed. In Ohio, a group called the Young Conservatives for the Freedom to Marry tried to remove anti-gay language from the Republican Party platform.

She has been called inevitable. The can't-be-stopped candidate. Hillary Rodham Clinton is such an overwhelming favorite in presidential primary polls that most prominent Democrats are taking a pass on challenging her.

Lufthansa was supposed to be celebrating the 60th anniversary of its postwar rebirth this month.

Casino gambling with cash payoffs is illegal in Texas. But on a drizzly Tuesday afternoon in February, you could not tell it by the scene inside a former tire shop near this Rio Grande Valley border town: a few dozen men and women gambling on 75 slot machines in windowless rooms.

Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin and his wife, Tonette, had planned to spend a recent Friday evening at the Nashua home of Jennifer Horn, the New Hampshire Republican chairwoman.

As the nuclear negotiations dragged into overtime here on Tuesday, some uniquely American and Iranian political sensitivities are permeating the marathon negotiating sessions, leading many to wonder whether two countries that have barely spoken for 35 years are just not ready to overcome old suspicions.

Since the Pennsylvania police arrested Anthony Kofalt last March for walking out of a Wal-Mart with 21 boxes of Crest White Strips he had not paid for, his wife, Heather, has spent $3,000 — about $60 a week — on phone calls to the prisons and jails where he has been held.

Jeanni McCarty, a nurse and native of this threadbare city of 4,200, hurried up and down Main Street in Saturday’s bright sun, handing out stacks of fliers to any business that would take them.

Ivan the Terrible, the Russian czar, should really be considered Ivan the Not So Bad, according to a wildly popular historical exhibition held recently near the Kremlin.

Zezza, who has managed physical production on movies like “The Reader” and “Nine,” also oversees the digital security of everything that goes into the making of a film, including budgets, casting, shooting schedules and scripts.

Washington state has long allowed immigrants without legal status to get driver’s licenses. So Ofelia Rosas Ramos, a Mexican living illegally in Seattle, has had her license since 2008.

He swaggers into the courtroom. Freed of handcuffs and leg manacles, he occasionally taps the witness box on his way to the defense table, where he takes his place between two lawyers.

When Carmen Aristegui, Mexico's most famous radio personality, was abruptly fired this month, nobody expected her to go quietly. But anger over her dismissal has been rising steadily, and it has turned up the heat in this country's charged political atmosphere.

Grant County, a mountainous patch of eastern Oregon, has few Native Americans, but maps point to a different past, marking a spring, a rock, three meadows and several creeks with "squaw" in their names.

Bill Clinton's hearing has faded. With his head of white hair and frail frame, he looks older than his 68 years - "truly grandfatherly," as one friend said. He often jokes about what would happen if he were to "drop dead

Miranda Lumsden, 43, a single mother of four, had never protested against anything before the Irish government introduced new water fees last summer.

Call it the revenge of the nerds, Washington-style. The gun-toting FBI agent and the swashbuckling CIA undercover officer are being increasingly called upon to share their clout, their budgets and even their Hollywood glamour with the humble, desk-bound intelligence analyst.

Already struggling to navigate the chaos engulfing much of the Middle East, the United States is now dipping its toe into another conflict.

The FBI has made great strides since the Sept. 11 attacks but urgently needs to improve its intelligence capabilities, hire more linguists and elevate the stature of its analysts to counter the rapidly evolving threats to the United States, according to a report released Wednesday.

She has worked for more than 30 years among the shoeshine men of Luxor. She sits with men in coffee shops, prays with them in the local mosque and dresses just as they do in pants or a traditional floor-length tunic known as a galabeya.

Fearing that Republicans will ultimately nominate an establishment presidential candidate like Jeb Bush, leaders of the nation's Christian right have mounted an ambitious effort to coalesce their support behind a single social-conservative contender months before the first primary votes are cast.


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