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Thursday, March 05, 2015         

New York Times

A couple of dozen students sat quietly inside the C.D.B. King Elementary School's dim and dusty auditorium on their first morning back. Despite the stuffy heat, many of the children wore long sleeves and trousers that covered as much skin as possible.

The revelation that Hillary Rodham Clinton conducted government business entirely on a private email account as secretary of state has blindsided the Democratic establishment.

The Supreme Court has the potential to radically reshape the Affordable Care Act, creating a result profoundly different from that imagined by President Barack Obama and the law's drafters in Congress.

On the last day of Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha's life, it was too cold to run. The 19-year-old North Carolina State University sophomore was training with a friend for a half-marathon in Raleigh.

When Stephanie Schriock was a junior at Butte High School in Montana, she devised a strategy to get elected student-body president.

Here is something every non-rich American family should know: The odds are that you will run out of money in retirement.

After a recent government crackdown on the multibillion-dollar career-training industry, stricter limits on student aid and devastating publicity about students hobbled by debt and useless credentials, some for-profit schools simply shut down.

He has publicly declared that "the Jews" control America, that apostates can be killed, that the United States is the world's "biggest terrorist" and that the Sept. 11 attacks were an "inside job" by President George W. Bush.

On the 35th floor of a two-bedroom rental overlooking the East River, L. Dennis Kozlowski lives with his new wife, Kimberly, in relative modesty — at least compared with his previous life as the extravagant chief executive of the conglomerate Tyco International.

It was evening at one of this city's most popular yoga centers, and teacher training was about to begin. Students wore flowing genie pants. Votive candles lit a classroom. Annie Prasad Freedom, the studio's founder, greeted arriving yogis.

Millions of Chinese, gripped and outraged, watched a 104-minute documentary video over the weekend that begins with a slight woman in jeans and a white blouse walking on to a stage dimly lit in blue. As an audience looks on somberly, the woman, Chai Jing, displays a graph of brown-red peaks with occasional troughs.

Mark Abraham, who has fished the New England coast for decades, kept a sharp eye on his catch as the slimy haddock spilled onto a dockside conveyor belt. He had just returned from 10 frigid days at sea, among the most brutal he has spent.

On Sunday, the county transit system for the Seattle metropolitan area began hurtling down a road that few cities have traveled before: pricing tickets based on passengers' income.

In Canada and Australia, young men inspired by the bloody, apocalyptic vision of the Islamic State were thwarted in their efforts to join the battle in Syria, so they took up arms in their homelands, staging small attacks that drew widespread attention.

Warren E. Buffett released his annual letter to shareholders Saturday, expounding on business, reflecting on his 50 years assembling one of the world's largest companies and adding to the growing tome of folk wisdom that has made him the rare beloved billionaire.

As the top American military commander who oversaw the Middle East and Central Asia, Gen. David H. Petraeus worked hard to court the political elite in Kazakhstan.

The Obama administration on Friday proposed a wide-ranging bill intended to provide Americans with more control over the personal information that companies collect about them and how that data can be used, fulfilling a promise the president had talked about for years.

A long-fought legal battle to recover $8.9 billion in damages from Exxon Mobil Corp. for the contamination and loss of use of more than 1,500 acres of wetlands, marshes, meadows and waters in northern New Jersey has been quietly settled by the state for around $250 million.

The prestigious consulting firm, known for its close ties to Gov. Rick Perry of Texas, was orchestrating an extensive effort to remake his image and prepare him for the 2016 presidential campaign.

For years, it was information shared only in whispers. An immigrant student, bright and educated but in the country illegally, wanted to go to college, and a precious few universities were willing, very quietly, to help them pay for it.

Prepared remarks are out. Answering tough questions is in. And there should be plenty of them — especially for a candidate named Bush. "We don't want to hear the same freaking stump speech 20 times," said Ned Ryun, a board member of the American Conservative Union.


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