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Typhoon Haiyan comes ashore in northern Vietnam

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A man looks at a tourist boat sinking in Ha Long Bay, Vietnam Monday, Nov. 11, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in northern Vietnam early Monday as a tropical storm, just days after leaving massive destruction in the Philippines. (AP Photo/Hau Dinh)
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HANOI >> Haiyan made landfall in northern Vietnam on Monday (Sunday in Hawaii) as a tropical storm, just days after leaving massive destruction in the Philippines as the season’s strongest typhoon.

The Vietnamese national weather agency said Haiyan made landfall in the northern province of Quang Ninh. The storm’s sustained winds weakened to 74 mph as the typhoon made landfall after crossing the South China Sea, according to the Hong Kong meteorological observatory.

State media quoted the National Search and Rescue Agency as saying that 13 people died and 81 others were injured while reinforcing their houses and trimming trees before Haiyan made landfall. The agency said the storm damaged more than 1,300 houses and 39 fishing boats in Quang Ninh.

The storm was expected to further weaken while dropping heavy rain on the Chinese provinces of Guangxi and Hunan. Guangxi officials advised fishermen to stay on shore and told residents to take precautions against flooding and landslides.

To the southeast of the Philippines another tropical depression has formed and may track toward the islands, according to the Japanese Meteorological Agency and the U.S. Navy.

"The potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is high," according to the U.S. Navy.

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