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Three nominated to state Board of Education

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Gov. David Ige on Tuesday named three nominees to the state Board of Education, including a banking executive and two former public school educators.

Ige named Lance Mizumoto, president and chief banking officer of Central Pacific Bank, to the board along with longtime Kauai educator Margaret Cox and former teacher Hubert Minn.

The three appointments, which are subject to confirmation by the state Senate, represent one-third of the nine-member board.

The BOE, by law, is charged with forming statewide educational policy, adopting student performance standards and assessment models, monitoring school success and appointing the superintendent.

“These nominees share my core beliefs and values,” Ige said in a statement. “They will be open, collaborative and represent the best values of Hawaii in their aloha for the students, teachers, principals and staff, and for each other. I am confident that under their leadership we will create a public school system of which we can all be truly proud.”

Mizumoto also serves on Chaminade University’s Board of Regents and on the Chamber of Commerce board.

Minn most recently was deputy director for the city’s Department of Enterprise Services. He previously served on the formerly elected Board of Education in the 1970s.

Cox, a retired high school science teacher and principal, previously was elected to two terms on the Board of Education, beginning in 2004. She was named to the board’s Kauai seat, currently held by Nancy Budd.

It wasn’t immediately clear who the other appointments are replacing on the board. Ige said one of the nominees will take an at-large seat held by Keith Amemiya.

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