comscore ELECTION BLOG: Blangiardi leads in the Honolulu mayoral race; Alm wins prosecutor race | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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ELECTION BLOG: Blangiardi leads in the Honolulu mayoral race; Alm wins prosecutor race

  • Video by Leila Fujimori

    Oahu voters waited in a long line at the Honolulu Hale on Election Day to cast their ballots.

  • JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the Kapolei Hale.

    JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the Kapolei Hale.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS / NOV. 2
                                Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a drive-in rally at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS / NOV. 2

    Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a drive-in rally at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh.

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Oahu voters cast their ballots today at voting machines inside the Honolulu Hale.

    CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Oahu voters cast their ballots today at voting machines inside the Honolulu Hale.

UPDATE: 11:29 p.m.

The results from the first printout, which includes all ballots collected as of Monday and all voters service centers except for Kapolei Hale, has been released.

>> Joe Biden leads Donald Trump in the Hawaii results of the presidential election.

>> Rick Blangiardi leads the Honolulu mayoral race over Keith Amemiya.

>> Steve Alm wins the Honolulu prosecuting attorney office over Megan Kau.

>> Mitch Roth holds a large lead over Ikaika Marzo in the Hawaii County mayoral race.

11:21 p.m.

Kapolei Hale has closed.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE

Hawaii Office of Elections Chief Scott Nago said there are about 80 people still waiting in line at the Kapolei Hale.

9:59 p.m.

The doors to the Honolulu Hale has just closed. The first printout results have yet to be released.

The first printout of election results, which was supposed to be released at 7 p.m., was expected to include all walk-in and mail-in ballots cast as of Monday. The original plan was for state elections officials to produce a second print out of all mail-in and walk-in votes cast on Election Day.

9:20 p.m.

Honolulu Mayor candidate Keith Amemiya’s campaign confirms Caldwell stopped by to visit him at their Halekauwila Street headquarters as well.

8:30 p.m.

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell has just showed up at mayoral candidate Rick Blangiardi’s gathering, according to Blangiardi campaign spokesman Alan Tang.

8:18 p.m.

Mark Phillips, 51, who lives in the Ala Moana area, arrived at the end of the line at precisely 7:01 p.m., but was unaware he needed a paper in-person voter application and just missed the election worker who left. He had been waiting for his mother-in-law, but she decided not to vote.

“I thought it was going to be in and out,” he said.

He had arrived earlier trying to find the end of the line and was unaware that he needed a form to be allowed to vote.

Rex Quidilla, City Elections Administrator, and other elections personnel arrived with a police officer at 7:10 p.m. or so to say they had to have the paper in-person ballot application, so Phillips and a few others were turned away.

7:57 p.m.

Sharie Mamuad, 21, of Waikiki, was the last person in line to vote at Honolulu Hale. She ran to make it to the polls at 7 p.m., because she had a work deadline to meet. She said she never received her ballot and it was the first time she voted.

A handful of voters were turned away at Honolulu Hale because they arrived at 7:01 p.m. or later.

7:43 p.m.

Common Cause Hawaii Executive Director Sandy Ma said that her organization this afternoon distributed water to people standing in line at Honolulu Hale, and water and pizza to those at Kapolei Hale. “The wait for in-person services at Kapolei Hawaii is longer,” she said.

7:15 p.m.

The Associated Press projects Joe Biden will win Hawaii and its four electoral votes in the presidential race despite Hawaii voters still waiting in the line to cast their ballots. The presidential candidate will need to capture 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

WHY AP CALLED HAWAII FOR BIDEN:

The AP declared Democrat Joe Biden the winner of Hawaii as soon as polls closed in the state, even though election officials there had yet to release any results from Tuesday’s presidential contest.

The news agency did so after results from AP VoteCast and an analysis of early voting statistics confirmed expectations that the state’s longstanding political trends in favor of Democratic presidential candidates will hold.

VoteCast, the AP’s wide-ranging survey of the American electorate, captures voters’ choices and why they made them.

A Republican presidential candidate hasn’t won Hawaii since Ronald Reagan in 1984. Trump lost Hawaii by 32 points in 2016.

7:06 p.m.

Polls have officially closed, but anyone waiting in line at 7 p.m. will still be allowed to vote.

6 p.m.

Cynthia Ochoa, 50, was waiting in line at Honolulu Hale since 3:30 p.m., because she did not receive her ballot in the mail. “I am making sure my vote is counted,” she said.

Waipahu resident Chad Soueira, 36, was also waiting in line as a first time voter. “It’s good to see that people are out to vote with all that’s going on in politics and the country,” he said.

Ala Moana resident Sue Park, 52, said this will be her first time voting for a U.S. president. Park, who was born in Korea, said she’s excited to participate in elections. “I was waiting for almost three hours, and hopefully the person I voted for can be president again,” she said.

The scene was similar at the Kapolei Hale, where hundreds of voters waited to cast their ballots before the polls close at 7 p.m.

5:08 p.m.

Voters are waiting for hours in line to cast their ballots at the Honolulu Hale, which starts from the parking garage behind the Honolulu Municipal Building. Voters who are still in line at 7 p.m. will still be allowed to vote.

>> RELATED: Voters in Hawaii endure long lines to cast ballots

>> PHOTOS: COVID-19 doesn’t stop Hawaii from taking part in Election Day

4:30 p.m.

Hawaii voters will find out the results tonight in many key races throughout the islands.

Hawaii Office of Elections Chief Scott Nago said today that 532,000 or 64% of all 832,466 registered voters have already cast their ballots as of Monday.

Voting continues today and potential voters can still register and vote at the “voter service centers” on all islands. Voters can also deposit their “mail-in” ballots at various sites across the state by 7 p.m. Locations can be found by clicking here.

Those who have not yet registered may vote as long as they are in line by 7 p.m. However, that may be the reason for the reported long lines at visitor centers.

Nago said potential voters can register in person at the voter service centers at Honolulu Hale and Kapolei Hale. Ballots must be dropped off by 7 p.m. in ballot boxes. He recommends taking them to a voter service center to drop off in the dropbox instead of waiting in line.

Voters can also check the status of their mail-in ballot at the state Elections Office website.

The first results will be released around 7 p.m. shortly after voter service centers close.

“Those first results will likely include all ballots received up until yesterday and some ballots received this morning,” Nago said. “At 10 p.m., elections officials will release all the in-person voting from the 10-day period. The final report will be when everything is done.”

Nago said the final report for the primary arrived at 11:30 a.m. the following day.

Bookmark this page and check back frequently for live updates of local races.


Go to https://808ne.ws/elections2020 for updates, resources and live results from today’s Hawaii Primary Election.


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