Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Monday, May 27, 2024 76° Today's Paper


Photo Galleries

Back in the Day: Photos from Hawaii’s Past

View historic Hawaii photos “back in the day.”

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STARADVERTISER / MARCH 21, 1966

Ray Graber of Los Angeles wipes the dust off his 1912 Ford as he picks up the antique automobile at the Matson freight terminal. Graber, a wheelwright, built the wheels for his car, which will join 29 other classics taking part in a 10-day “horseless carriage” tour of Oahu and Kauai.
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STARADVERTISER / MARCH 5, 1983

Moni Togiai, left, and Lynn Scanlan, right, watch Malalega Atuaia as she demonstrates how to squeeze ava root during a Samoan culture class at the Polynesian Cultural Center in Laie.
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STARADVERTISER / DECEMBER 13, 1959

Mason Hironaka, right, of Loyalty Enterprises and Julia Wong examine a map pinpointing each of the fee-simple lots being offered to the public in units 4 and 5 of the Moanalua Gardens subdivision.
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STARADVERTISER / MAY 9, 1965

Clifton Yarbrough, 5, seen through a window, examines a Hercules Nike missile on display at Schofield Barracks.
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STARADVERTISER / SEPTEMBER 25, 1990

Denise Brown sends a fax message to her military husband in Saudi Arabia from the AT&T office in down- town Honolulu. AT&T is offering the free “Desert Fax” service to islanders left behind when their family members are deployed to the Middle East. Messages are sent electronically and delivered quicker than letters or packages.
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STARADVERTISER / APRIL 17, 1978

Margaret McMillan, lower left, conducts art classes at various locations on the island. One of the places her students enjoy painting the most is the stream at Kahaluu next to the Hygienic Store, with the Koolau Range in the background. “We call this the million-dollar river,” McMillan said.
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STARADVERTISER / JUNE 16, 1965

Three youngsters explore a trestle over the Ala Wai Canal built by Moses Akiona Ltd. to enable construction of the Kamoku-Kapiolani interceptor relief sewer line beneath the canal’s bottom. It will be removed when the sewer line is in place, as will another, larger trestle at Sandy Beach erected by Healy Tibbitts Construction Co. for placement beneath the seabed of the Hawaii Kai sewage outfall pipe.