• Sunday, September 23, 2018
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Islands no longer under flash flood watch as Olivia moves away from Hawaii

  • A couple walks in a rainstorm amid heavy traffic in Paia, Hawaii, on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, as Tropical Storm Olivia marched closer to Maui. Olivia was expected to pass directly over Maui on Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. (Matthew Thayer/The News via AP)
  • CENTRAL PACIFIC HURRICANE CENTER

    Tropical Depression Olivia’s location as of 5 a.m. HST.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    This photo provided by Lori-Lei Rawlins-Crivello shows the rising Kaunakakai Gulch in Kaunakakai, Hawaii, on Molokai on Wednesday after Tropical Storm Olivia brought rain and wind to the island.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    This photo shows waterfalls flowing into Iao Valley on Mauna Kahalawai in Hawaii. Heavy rain and winds from a tropical storm downed trees, knocked out power and prompted evacuations of several homes on Maui.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    This photo shows floodwater in the parking lot of a condo complex at Kahana Village in Lahaina. Heavy rain and winds from a tropical storm downed trees, knocked out power and prompted evacuations of several homes on Maui.

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UPDATE: 4:15 p.m.

The National Weather Service in Honolulu has canceled the statewide flash flood watch and the flood advisory for the Big Island as Tropical Depression Olivia moved further away from the state.

The storm was about 375 miles west-southwest of Honolulu at 11 a.m., with 35 mph sustained winds and moving west-southwest at 14 mph, after making direct hits on Maui and Lanai Wednesday morning. Heavy rain fell over several islands, including Oahu, Wednesday night and Thursday morning as Olivia moved away from the islands.

1:33 p.m.

The flood advisory for Hawaii island has been extended and expanded, the National Weather service said.

“At 1:14 p.m., radar and rain gauges showed that moderate to heavy rainfall has developed along the leeward slopes of the Big Island from the South Kona District to the South Kohala District,” forecasters said. “Rainfall is also ongoing along the eastern and southeastern slopes from Hilo to Naalehu. The rainfall is expected to diminish by sunset.”

The advisory lasts until 4:15 p.m. and includes all locations on the Big Island south of a line from Honokaa to Puako, they said.

12:28 p.m.

The flash flood warning for Oahu has expired, but the entire state remains under a flash flood watch and parts of Hawaii island are under a flood advisory.

The aftermath of former Tropical Storm Olivia dumped heavy rain throughout Oahu overnight and this morning, but the rain storms have moved west toward Kauai.

Still, the state is under a flash flood watch through late tonight.

In addition, a flood advisory for the Big Island is in effect until 1:30 p.m. “At 10:17 a.m., radar and rain gauges showed moderate to heavy rainfall continuing across the eastern slopes of the Big Island. The highest rain rates were around 1 inch per hour in the South Hilo and Puna Districts,” according to the National Weather Service in Honolulu. “Water levels in Wailuku River and Honolii Stream have been steadily rising over the past several hours. The rainfall is expected to continue into the afternoon.”

The advisory includes, but is not limited to, Hilo, Hawaiian Acres, Paauilo, Orchidland Estates, Mountain View, Papaikou, Keaau, Volcano, Hawaiian Paradise Park, Pahoa and Honomu.

10:50 a.m.

Hawaii Kai-bound lanes along Kalanianaole Highway near Makapuu Point Lighthouse Trail have reopened.

In addition, Kamehameha Highway between Waikane Valley Road and Waiahole Valley Road has been reopened.

Hawaiian Electric Co. also reported that power was restored at 10:30 a.m. to the 3,290 customers affected in the Wailupe-Aina Haina area.

10:18 a.m.

The Board of Water Supply said Nuuanu Dam #1 is about a 1.5 feet below the spillway due to heavy rain from former Tropical Storm Olivia, raising the possibility of an evacuation of up to 10,000 residents.

“BWS has been monitoring and siphoning the excess water from the reservoir since the beginning of the week to keep the water level below the spillway,” board officials said. “However, with the passing of Olivia, the rain exceeded the siphoning capacity. BWS and Honolulu Fire Department personnel are currently deployed at the dam with water pumps to bring the level of the reservoir down further.” About 10,000 residents would be affected, they said.

Kathleen Elliott-Pahinui, spokeswoman for BWS, said, “If something were to breach, there’s the possibility that it could end up all the way into the harbor. … Anything in the immediate area and everything downstream” is potentially at risk.

BWS said it is working with the mayor’s office and city Department of Emergency Management to coordinate the operations plan, which includes public evacuation notification and sheltering if needed.

Click here for more updates on this breaking story.

10:04 a.m.

The Hawaiian Electric Co. reported on Twitter at 9:50 a.m. that 3,290 customers are without power in the Wailupe-Aina Haina area. HECO crews are en route to investigate.

9:45 a.m.

The City and County of Honolulu reported Kamehameha Highway is closed in both directions in Waiahole between Waikane Valley Road and Waiahole Valley Road due to flooding.

There was no immediate estimate as to when it will be reopened.

9:15 a.m.

A flash flood warning has been issued for Oahu until noon today.

“At 9:06 a.m., radar indicated heavy rain continuing to fall across Oahu. A gauge at Waikane Stream showed a sudden rise in water levels. This is expected to cause flooding along Kamehameha Highway at the Waikane Stream Bridge. Rain gauges on the slopes of the Koolau Range showed numerous reports of rain rates at 1 to 2 inches per hour,” the National Weather Service said.

8:45 a.m.

The Hawaii Kai-bound lanes along Kalanianaole Highway are closed near Makapuu Point Lighthouse Trail as a result of flooding on the roadway. Drivers should avoid the area.

7:57 a.m.

The National Weather Service extended Maui County’s flash flood warning until 9:15 a.m.

At 7:44 a.m., the radar showed heavy rain continuing to pour along the windward slopes of Haleakala National Park. The rain gauge measured rainfall rates of 1 to 2 inches per hour.

The areas of Hana Highway, Piilani Highway between Waiopae and Kipahulu, and Waikoloa Road and Ulaino Road near Hana are at the greatest risk of flooding on roads and streams. Avoid crossing fast-flowing water, the advisory warned.

Locations in the warning include but are not limited to Huelo, Pauwela, Paia, Keanae, Nahiku, Hana, Kaupo and Kula.

If heavy rain persists, the warning might be extended beyond 9:15 a.m.

7:32 a.m.

Oahu is still under a flood advisory as of 7:32 a.m.

Moderate to heavy rainfall continues to move over windward Oahu from the southeast.

The National Weather Service detected rainfall rates of about one inch per hour with the most intense rainfall offshore to the east of Oahu. Heavy rain is expected to persist over the Koolau through the morning.

Locations in the advisory include but are not limited to Honolulu, Palolo, Kahaluu, Hauula, Waimanalo, Mililani, Haleiwa, Wahiawa, Waialua, Schofield Barracks, Kaneohe Marine Base and Hawaii Kai.

The flood advisory expires 10:30 a.m. If heavy rainfall continues, the advisory might be extended beyond 10:30 a.m.

6:29 a.m.

Maui County is under a flash flood warning until 9:15 a.m.

At 6:18 a.m., the National Weather Service radar showed heavy rain bands moving across the slopes of Haleakala National Park from the southeast. Rainfall rates measured 1 to 2 inches per hour.

“At greatest risk are the Hana Highway, Piilani Highway between Waiopae and Kipahulu, and Waikoloa Road and Ulaino Road near Hana,” the advisory warned.

Locations in the warning include but are not limited to Huelo, Pauwela, Paia, Keanae, Nahiku, Hana, Kaupo and Kula.

If heavy rain continues on the island of Maui, the warning might extend beyond 9:15 a.m.

5:54 a.m.

The National Weather Service in Honolulu has issued a flood advisory for Hawaii County until 7:30 a.m.

At 4:37 a.m., the National Weather Service rain gauge measured moderate to heavy rain moving over the Big isle’s windward side, affecting the areas of Puna and Hilo.

Locations in the advisory include but are not limited to Hilo, Hawaiian Acres, Hawaiian Paradise Park, Paauilo, Orchidlands Estates, Glenwood, Pepeekeo, Keaau, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Pahoa and Honomu.

A flash flood watch remains in effect for the entire state of Hawaii.

5 a.m.

Tropical Depression Olivia is moving rapidly at 18 mph toward the west-southwest far away from the Hawaiian isles.

Heavy showers continue to drench parts of Hawaii with additional rainfall of 3 to 5 inches expected in some areas, while 6 to 8 inches of rainfall might be expected over higher terrain.

The National Weather Service radar indicated some portions of Oahu received between 1 and 9 inches of rainfall over a 24-hour period, while some areas of Maui and Molokai received more than 6 inches of rainfall. Puu Kukui on Maui accumulated 6.67 inches of rain, while Manoa Lyon Arboretum on Oahu received 9.16 inches of rainfall within 24 hours.

A flash flood watch remains in effect for all Hawaiian isles.

“Since the ground is already saturated over many areas, additional heavy rainfall may produce life-threatening flash flooding,” the advisory said.

Olivia was located about 250 miles southwest of Lihue and about 305 miles west-southwest of Honolulu. Olivia was packing maximum sustained winds of 35 mph with higher gusts.

Little change in Olivia’s strength is expected through tonight. Forecasters are predicting Olivia will become a post-tropical remnant low by Friday.

4:25 a.m.

As Tropical Storm Olivia moves away from Hawaii as a tropical depression, forecasters are warning that heavy rainfall might lead to flash flooding.

A flash flood watch remains in effect through late tonight for the entire state, according to the National Weather Service. The advisory expires 6 a.m. Friday.

The NWS radar indicated light to moderate rain moving over Oahu with rainfall rates below one inch per hour. Runoff will remain high for the next few hours.

Avoid crossing fast-flowing water by car or foot, the advisory said. “Flooding may affect areas that do not usually flood,” the advisory said. “Low spots in roads may become dangerous and impassable due to severe runoff. Debris in streams and gulches may clog bridges and culverts resulting in dangerous flooding. Scattered landslides are expected.”

Locations in the advisory include but are not limited to the Big Island (interior, north, east, south, summit), Oahu (central, north shore and south shore), Kauai (leeward, mountains and windward), Lanai (makai and mauka), Maui (central valley, leeward west and windward west), Molokai (leeward and windward) and Niihau.

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