comscore Ignacio, now a tropical storm, brings dangerous surf to islands | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Hawaii News | Top News

Ignacio, now a tropical storm, brings dangerous surf to islands

  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
    The high surf generated from Hurricane Ignacio washed rocks onto Hilo Bayfront Highway.
  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
    The high surf generated from Hurricane Ignacio washed rocks onto Hilo Bayfront Highway.
  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
    The high surf generated from Hurricane Ignacio washed rocks onto Hilo Bayfront Highway.
  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
    The high surf generated from Hurricane Ignacio washed rocks onto Hilo Bayfront Highway.

  • DARYL LEE / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER
    The high surf generated from Hurricane Ignacio washed rocks onto Hilo Bayfront Highway.
[ AD HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THIS STORY ]

Lightning struck a Hawaii island house and isolated heavy rain was reported there as a weakening Ignacio continued moving away from the Hawaiian Islands on Tuesday.

The lightning caused some damage but nothing serious, and Ignacio weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm.

Surf generated by Ignacio washed sand and debris over roadways, prompted rescues and closed beaches across the state. Uncomfortable humidity made temperatures felt like the high 90s and brought scattered heavy afternoon showers. Spotty, intense rain was part of the statewide forecast through Thursday.

Surf was expected to range from 10 to 15 feet on east-facing shores and from 9 to 12 feet Wednesday on north shores.

Because of surf with up to 15-foot faces on East Oahu beaches, lifeguards performed 22 rescues Tuesday. As of 3:15 p.m., lifeguards made six rescues at Sandy Beach and one at Makapuu Beach. Overall, there were 15 rescues by personal watercraft.

Shayne Enright, spokeswoman for the Honolulu Emergency Services Department, reported that lifeguards performed 65 preventive actions, helped 105 people to shore, and made 125 assists by personal watercraft. Enright said lifeguards are asking the public to stay away from ledges and where the waves crash on the rocks.

On Hawaii island, lightning struck the porch of a house at Hawaiian Paradise Park in Puna on Tuesday, according to Hawaii Island Civil Defense. No one was injured and the house remained livable. Authorities were continuing to monitor episodes of heavy rain, said Civil Defense Administrator Darryl Oliveira.

High surf generated by Ignacio closed beach parks at Coconut Island, Onekahakaha, Kealoha and the Bayfront canoe area and Bayfront Highway in Hilo between Pauahi Street and Waianuenue Avenue. The surf also sent sand and ocean debris over Kamehameha Highway near Kaaawa Elementary School on Oahu.

On Kauai, officials closed Poipu Beach and all east-facing beaches, from Anahola to Lydgate beach parks, because of high surf and hazardous ocean conditions.

A high-surf warning for east-facing shores is in effect until 6 p.m. Thursday. A reinforcement swell from Hurricane Jimena is forecast to arrive Wednesday and the high surf warning may be extended.

At 5 a.m. Wednesday, Tropical Storm Ignacio was about 335 miles north of Honolulu and 460 miles north-northwest of Hilo, moving northwest at 12 mph. The storm had sustained winds of 70 mph. Tropical-storm strength winds extended 205 miles from the center.

“Rain bands associated with the outer circulation of tropical cyclone Ignacio were moving across the leeward waters of the Big Island and the Alenuihaha channel. Passing showers were also observed over Maui county and Oahu during the overnight hours,” the National Weather Service said Wednesday morning.

“Ignacio is still blocking the trades,” the National Weather Service said. “Muggy conditions and showery weather will prevail during the next several days, especially in the afternoon hours.”

The humid conditions generated by Ignacio will make it feel like temperatures are in the upper 90s, forecasters said.

Meanwhile, Jimena weakened to a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph Wednesday.

At 5 a.m. Wednesday, the National Weather Service said Jimena was 815 miles east-southeast of Hilo and was expected to eventually take a northerly course about 700 to 800 miles east of Hawaii island. It was moving west-northwest at 8 mph.

Comments have been disabled for this story...

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.

Be the first to know
Get web push notifications from Star-Advertiser when the next breaking story happens — it's FREE! You just need a supported web browser.
Subscribe for this feature

Scroll Up