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New video, photos show Kilauea lava flows widening

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    Amidst steam created by rain falling on the hot lava, a geologist uses a rock hammer to collect a sample of lava from a new flow.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    A Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist maps the location of active lava from the eastern breakout Wednesday.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    The second flow from the eastern breakout on Puu Oo—in the area of the “Peace Day” flow that broke out in September 2011—remained active as of this morning, and its total length was about 0.75 miles long. This lava flow was slowly spreading laterally, but the flow front had stalled.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    This photo taken Wednesday shows slightly closer view of the lava flow from the eastern breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. This flow has not advanced significantly since Tuesday, but it is slowly widening.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    As of 8:30 a.m. today, lava continued to flow from two breakout sites on the flanks of Puu Oo. At the northern breakout, a new lobe of lava broke out of yesterday’s active channel and was advancing to the northwest. This new lobe of lava had advanced about 0.6 miles as of this morning. Tuesday’s channel—now inactive—is visible to the right of today’s flow.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    This morning, the northern breakout on Puu Oo was feeding an impressive channel of lava that extended about 0.6 mi northwest of the cone. This channel was about 32 feet wide.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    A new lava breakout began Tuesday morning on the northeast flank of Puu Oo and extended for .6 miles by 8:30 a.m.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    This image taken from video shows a lava flow that began Tuesday morning on the northeast flank of Puu Oo.

  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY This is a wider view of a lava flow on the northeast flank of Puu Oo.
  • COURTESY USGS / HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

    Another breakout occurred just east of Puu Oo this morning about .3 miles from the crater, in the area of the “Peace Day” flow that broke out in September 2011. This second breakout was smaller than the one on the northeast flank, but was still feeding an impressive lava channel.

New lava flows at Kilauea volcano have slowed and widened and did not advance significantly overnight, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawaii County Civil Defense said today.

“Overflights at 8:30 a.m. this morning and at 2:30 p.m. this afternoon showed both breakouts are approximately the same length as yesterday and remain in areas that have been previously covered by older lava flows,” civil defense officials said in a message to the public.

The new lava flows began Tuesday from the northeast and east flank of Puu Oo Crater.

The larger breakout, on the northeast flank of Puu Oo, is moving northwest in the Kahaualea Natural Area Reserve. The smaller breakout from the east flank is moving southeast.

The lava flows do not pose an immediate threat to nearby communities, Hawaii County Civil Defense said Tuesday. However, residents may see a glow from the lava at night.

The larger flow advanced about .6 miles Tuesday and the other flow moved about .75 miles.

The northern flow changed course slightly overnight, but is still headed northwest and is spreading out at the flow front. A lava channel that was active Tuesday has stalled, but the flow is being fed by a new lava channel.

The eastern flow was also widening and did not advance significantly.

The furthest active lava flow, from a breakout on June 27th, extends 3.6 miles northeast of Puu Oo.

The observatory released new videoand photos of the new lava flows today.

Meanwhile, at the summit of Kilauea, the lava lake level in Halemaumau Crater rose to about 75 feet below the crater floor on Tuesday, high enough for spattering to be seen from the Jaggar overlook, and then dropped this morning to about 100 feet below the crater floor.

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  • Since 1983 Kilauea has been erupting so the question begs, what/where is the source and if the core of the earth, is there a never ending supply. Like a container dripping water, unless replenished it become empty. Thus, somewhere on the earth there must some loss corresponding to the outflow?

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