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First case of travel-related Zika reported on Hawaii island

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

A researcher holds a container with female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo’s University, in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

A travel-related case of Zika has been reported on Hawaii island.

The state Department of Health and the Hawaii County said today in a press release that it is the first travel-related case of Zika confirmed on Hawaii island.

The Hawaii island resident who contracted the virus recently traveled to the South Pacific and is past the point of being infectious to mosquitoes, officials said.

Health officials said there have been no locally acquired Zika cases in Hawaii and no mosquitoes here have transmitted the disease .

A state Vector Control team was sent to the individual’s residence and workplace to survey the areas for mosquitoes and treat possible areas of concern.

“The County of Hawaii is working with the Department of Health to take proactive steps to assess affected areas for mosquito activity, educate communities, and treat mosquito breeding sites,” said Civil Defense Administrator Ed Teixeira. “This event is a reminder that we all need to remain vigilant and take steps to prevent mosquito bites especially when traveling to affected areas worldwide, and eliminate mosquitoes by emptying standing water where they can breed.”

State officials said imported or travel-related cases of Zika are expected to increase, and advise travelers to use repellent and avoid mosquitoes.

4 responses to “First case of travel-related Zika reported on Hawaii island”

  1. dontbelieveinmyths says:

    Someone please explain to me what the headline means. If this is the first travel related Zika, what are the other Zika cases considered?

  2. reader503 says:

    “The Hawaii island resident who contracted the virus recently traveled to the South Pacific and is past the point of being infectious to mosquitoes, officials said.”

    But, was the resident potentially infectious upon their initial arrival back in Hawaii? Was there a period of time that they could have passed on the infection via mosquitoes? Such as during the time of their arrival and the time it took for the results by the State? {CDC states: Depending on the lab’s workload, processing and reporting times may take 2 to 4 weeks.]

    Besides mosquitoes, there is also sexual transmission.

    CDC: “Men – consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 6 months after travel (if you don’t have symptoms) or for at least 6 months from the start of symptoms (or Zika diagnosis) if you develop Zika.
    Women- consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 8 weeks after travel (if you don’t have symptoms) or for at least 8 weeks from the start of symptoms (or Zika diagnosis) if you develop Zika.”

    I hope the State is not downplaying this severity of the situation by trying to not “scare the public”, instead of putting full info out.

  3. cojef says:

    Someone is thinking about cornering the repellant market and make some dough? Or corner the pesticide market! Old fashioned method of emptying cans or containers where water can collect costs no money, only muscle power and time, which is money in Hawaii.

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