2 of 3 Eastern Pacific storms strengthen overnight
  • Wednesday, June 19, 2019
  • 81°
Top News

2 of 3 Eastern Pacific storms strengthen overnight

  • NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

    Tropical Storm Greg, Hurricane Irwin and Hurricane Hilary were seen in a satellite image taken today at 4:25 a.m.

  • COURTESY NOAA

    This enhanced satellite image shows the remnants of Fernanda passing north of Oahu and Kauai, while three tropical cyclones — Greg, Irwin and Hilary — churn in the Eastern Pacific this afternoon.

  • COURTESY NOAA

    Tropical Storm Greg continues moving west through the Central Pacific at 12 mph with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph.

Update 5:00 a.m.

Two of the three storms in the Eastern Pacific strengthened overnight.

Tropical Storm Greg, which is closest to the Central Pacific at about 1,270 miles east of South Point on Hawaii island, weakened slightly and now has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. The storm is moving west-northwest at 10 mph.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles from the center.

Forecasters with the National Weather Service expect Greg to continue weakening over the next couple of days.

Hurricane Hilary, which is farthest away from the islands at 540 miles south-southeast of the southern tip of Baja, California, is packing maximum sustained winds of 105 mph.

Forecasters expect Hilary to become a major hurricane later today. The storm is moving west-northwest at 12 mph.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles.

Irwin, now a hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 80 mph, sits between the other two storms at 800 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja, California. The storm is headed west at 6 mph.

Forecasters expect little change in the storm’s intensity over the next few days.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles.

Update 7:15 p.m.

The threat of flooding from the former tropical cyclone Fernanda has eased but forecasters are focused on three more named storms churning out in the Eastern Pacific and heading west.

The National Weather Service canceled flood advisories for Oahu and parts of Maui this evening, as remnants from former hurricane and tropical storm Fernanda passed north of the islands and moved away from the state.

The immediate forecast calls for an end to the high humidity and showers caused by Fernanda. “More settled conditions should start to return tonight as drier air and more stable air return,” forecasters said. “Breezy trades, more sunshine, and less humid conditions are expected for the rest of the week as high pressure well to the north of the state regains control of our weather.”

But the National Hurricane Center, which monitors the Eastern Pacific, is watching three tropical cyclones of varying strengths.

Closest to the Central Pacific, Tropical Storm Greg was about 1,405 miles east of South Point at 5 p.m. today, traveling west-northwest at 9 mph, with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. The forecast calls for it to enter the Central Pacific by midweek, but to dissipate into a remnant low by the weekend as it takes a southwesterly turn, hundreds of miles southwest of the Big Island.

Behind Greg is Tropical Storm Irwin, which was about 760 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, moving west-northwest at 3 mph, with maximum sustained winds of 70 mph. Forecasters expect the storm to grow into a Category 1 hurricane by midweek, before weakening back to a tropical storm by the weekend, and heading north far from the Central Pacific.

The most powerful — and farthest from Hawaii — of the three Eastern Pacific storms is Hurricane Hilary. At 5 p.m. today, Hilary was a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph. It was about 290 miles south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, heading west-northwest at 9 mph. Hilary is expected to become a major hurricane Tuesday, with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph as it moves farther away from Mexico. Hilary is forecast to weaken back to a minimal hurricane by Saturday as it continues on a northwest track, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

All three storms are too far from Hawaii to know if they could eventually effect the state’s weather.

Update 4:55 p.m.

A flood advisory for parts of Maui has been canceled, but Oahu remains under another advisory, the National Weather Service says.

Update 4:20 p.m.

Oahu is under a flood advisory until 7:15 p.m. as the remnants of the former tropical storm and hurricane Fernanda pass north of the island.

“At 4:08 p.m., radar indicated heavy rain and isolated thunderstorms over the Koolau range and spreading along the north shore to the Waianae range,” the National Weather Service advisory said. “Rain was falling at a rate of 1 to 2 inches inches per hour, but heavier rain is possible.”

The advisory included Hauula, Mililani, Haleiwa, Wahiawa, Waialua, Schofield Barracks, Kahaluu, Ahuimanu, Maunawili, Kaneohe, Waianae and Wheeler Field, forecasters said. They advise the public to stay away from streams, drainage ditches and low-lying areas prone to flooding.

The immediate forecast for Oahu calls for continued humid weather and the possibility of heavy showers or thunderstorms. “More settled conditions should start to return tonight as drier air and more stable air return,” forecasters said. “Breezy trades, more sunshine, and less humid conditions are expected for the rest of the week as high pressure well to the north of the state regains control of our weather.”

An earlier flood advisory for parts of central Maui remains in effect until 5:50 p.m.

Update 3:55 p.m.

National Weather Service officials canceled a flash flood watch for Kauai County but issued a flood advisory for the island of Maui until 5:30 p.m.

At 2:31 p.m. radar showed heavy rain over the leeward slopes of Haleakala falling at a rate of 1 to 2 inches per hour.

Locations of the advisory include but aren’t limited to Kahului, Kihei, Haiku-Pauwela, Puunene, Haliimaile, Kula, Pukalani, Makawao, Keokea, Paia, Wailea and Maalaea.

Tropical Storm Greg showed no change in intensity and continued to move west, weather officials said.

At 2 p.m., Greg was located about 1445 miles east of the Big Island traveling at 12 mph with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph.

Tropical-storm-force winds are expected to reach out up to 70 miles to the northwest of the storm’s center.

There are no coastal warnings and watches in effect.

Previous coverage

The remnants of Fernanda will continue moving west today, across Oahu and Kauai County, dumping rain on areas of the latter, as two tropical storms and a hurricane continue heading toward the Central Pacific.

A flash flood watch for Kauai County is in effect until 6 p.m. Weather officials canceled an earlier flood advisory for Oahu shortly before 9:40 a.m.

Forecasters said Fernanda’s remnants are bringing showers and thunderstorms to Kauai and Niihau.

The weather service said that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding.

As of 11 a.m. today, there was no change in strength for Tropical Storm Greg, which still had maximum sustained winds of 45 miles per hour. The storm was located about 1,445 miles east of South Point on Hawaii island, moving west at 12 miles per hour.

Forecasters predict that Greg will turn toward either the west-northwest or northwest as it loses forward speed over the next few days.

Meanwhile, Hurricane Hilary continued to gain strength off the coast of Mexico.

At 11 a.m., Hilary was 315 miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico, and packing maximum sustained winds of 85 miles per hour. The storm was moving west-northwest at 8 miles per hour.

Also, Tropical Storm Irwin continued to strengthen and was carrying maximum sustained winds of 65 miles per hour as of 11 a.m. The storm was about 750 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja, California, and moving west at 3 miles per hour.

Irwin is expected to develop into a hurricane by tonight.

Forecasters predict muggy conditions across the state, with possible heavy showers or thunderstorms through this evening. Breezy trades, lighter humidity and a more settled weather pattern are expected to return tonight as a high-pressure system northeast of the islands asserts itself.

Comments (0)

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Terms of Service. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. Report comments if you believe they do not follow our guidelines.

Having trouble with comments? Learn more here.

Scroll Up