comscore EPA blocks unregistered disinfectant from entering Hawaii ports | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Top News

EPA blocks unregistered disinfectant from entering Hawaii ports

  • COURTESY EPA
                                The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today said it has stopped several shipments of an illegal health product – Virus Shut Out — from entering U.S. Pacific ports due to violations of federal pesticide laws.

    COURTESY EPA

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today said it has stopped several shipments of an illegal health product – Virus Shut Out — from entering U.S. Pacific ports due to violations of federal pesticide laws.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today said it has stopped several shipments of an illegal health product – Virus Shut Out — from entering U.S. Pacific ports due to violations of federal pesticide laws.

The EPA said said Virus Shut Out, a product imported from Japan and Hong Kong through U.S. ports in Honolulu and Guam, is not registered with the agency, nor has its safety and efficacy against viruses been evaluated. Also, its labels, including directions for use, are not provided in English as required by law.

The product’s online advertising materials, which market it as a badge with chlorine dioxide worn around the neck to provide a barrier, also contain misleading clams about its safety and effectiveness, the EPA said.

“It is critical that people only use EPA-registered disinfectants and follow label directions for proper use,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator John Busterud in a news release. “EPA will not tolerate companies selling illegal disinfectants and making false or misleading public health claims during this pandemic crisis.”

Upon EPA’s request, Amazon has also removed the product from its online marketplace. The agency is also working with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to deny entry to the illegal product, and both will continue monitoring for products with illegal pesticidal claims.

Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, products that claim to kill or repel bacteria or germs are considered pesticides, and therefore must be registered with the EPA prior to distribution or sale. The agency will not register a pesticide until it has been determined that it will not pose an unreasonable risk when used according to the label directions.

The EPA warns that products not registered by the agency can be harmful to human health, cause adverse effects, and may not be effective against the spread of germs.

EPA has released an expanded list of EPA-registered disinfectant products — including 300 additional ones — that have qualified for use against SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.

Be the first to know
Get web push notifications from Star-Advertiser when the next breaking story happens — it's FREE! You just need a supported web browser.
Subscribe for this feature
Comments (20)

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Terms of Service. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. Report comments if you believe they do not follow our guidelines.

Having trouble with comments? Learn more here.

Scroll Up