comscore Lava from Guatemala’s Pacaya volcano threatens towns | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Top News

Lava from Guatemala’s Pacaya volcano threatens towns

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Shrouded by clouds and volcanic ash particles, lava flowed down the slopes of the Pacaya Volcano, near El Patrocinio village in San Vicente Pacaya, Guatemala, today. The 8,373-foot volcano, just 30 miles south of Guatemala’s capital, has been active since early February.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Shrouded by clouds and volcanic ash particles, lava flowed down the slopes of the Pacaya Volcano, near El Patrocinio village in San Vicente Pacaya, Guatemala, today. The 8,373-foot volcano, just 30 miles south of Guatemala’s capital, has been active since early February.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Men chatted amid a band of hardened lava that flowed from the Pacaya Volcano, near El Patrocinio village in San Vicente Pacaya, Guatemala, today. The 8,373-foot volcano, just 30 miles south of Guatemala’s capital, has been active since early February.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Men chatted amid a band of hardened lava that flowed from the Pacaya Volcano, near El Patrocinio village in San Vicente Pacaya, Guatemala, today. The 8,373-foot volcano, just 30 miles south of Guatemala’s capital, has been active since early February.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Lava flowed down the slopes of the Pacaya Volcano near El Patrocinio village in San Vicente Pacaya, Guatemala, today. The 8,373-foot volcano, just 30 miles south of Guatemala’s capital, has been active since early February.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Lava flowed down the slopes of the Pacaya Volcano near El Patrocinio village in San Vicente Pacaya, Guatemala, today. The 8,373-foot volcano, just 30 miles south of Guatemala’s capital, has been active since early February.

EL PATROCINIO, Guatemala >> Residents of small communities living around Guatemala’s Pacaya volcano wake each day wondering if the lava will reach their homes.

A lava flow descending the volcano has advanced between El Patrocinio and San José el Rodeo. In the case of the latter, the lava has advanced to within two and half blocks of the outermost homes.

Emma Quezada, a 38-year-old homemaker in one of those houses, has lived there her entire life and said she’s used to the volcanic activity. Still, this time she’s afraid.

“These last three days the lava stopped; we hope it stays there,” Quezada said.

Local authorities had spoken to residents about moving the community to another location some 62 miles away, but without the space they have now, she said.

“As if you’re going to go from here to a little piece of land!” she said. “Maybe we don’t have a great thing here, but we live in blessed peace, we don’t face any other danger, not even thieves… The options they give you don’t compare with what we have here.”

The Pacaya volcano rises some 8,372 feet between the departments of Guatemala and Escuintla south of the capital. It’s a popular tourist destination and 21 communities surround it.

In early February, a chasm opened in one of the volcano’s flanks and lava began to flow, now stretching at least three miles. Meanwhile ash and gases spewed from its crater.

Even if the lava doesn’t reach their homes, the ash has damaged their corn crops and the pastures where their cows graze.

El Rodeo is home to 57 families, some 350 people, said Juventino Pineda, president of the Urban and Rural Development Community Council.

Pineda, 67, can recall various eruptions during his lifetime. “One of the worst was 1962, I was a child and lava also came out of a fissure in the volcano, that time it was 20 kilometers of lava,” he said.

This time, Pineda says “we believe that at least 50% of the homes in the community would be destroyed because of the lava’s path.” There is an evacuation plan if the situation worsens.

“At night, when the volcano erupts, everything turns red, everything shines, it looks like day,” Pineda said.

Approaching the lava you can feel the ambient temperature rise. There’s a light sulfur smell and you can hear a crunching.

“It’s important to know that we need help, maybe someone can help us on the international level,” Pineda said.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.

Be the first to know
Get web push notifications from Star-Advertiser when the next breaking story happens — it's FREE! You just need a supported web browser.
Subscribe for this feature
Comments (0)

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Terms of Service. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. Report comments if you believe they do not follow our guidelines.

Having trouble with comments? Learn more here.

Scroll Up