comscore Mike Shanahan, Author at Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Eager star-gazers abound in islands

Aloha everybody! This will be my final Skywatch article. I am delighted, and a little wistful, to announce that I have accepted a position at the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, N.J., across from lower Manhattan. Read more

‘Cruel sun’ at noon comes back in July

While we lose the Southern Cross from the Hawaiian Islands by the time July starts, the month does provide a last chance to catch the brilliant stars Alpha and Beta Centauri, the best summertime stars we see in Hawaii and which are not visible from most of the United States. Read more

Lahaina Noon will strike isles next month

In the tropics, the sun passes overhead twice during the year. On these two days, the sun will be exactly overhead at midday and an upright object such as a flagpole will have no shadow. Read more

Stunning ‘supermoon’ will light up November

We will have the biggest, brightest full moon in decades in November. We also lose Saturn and regain Mercury in November as Venus and Mars, opposites in myth, behave in a similar, steady manner. Read more

3 planets will brighten isles’ night sky in June

Sky watching will be very good in the islands in June. A trio of bright planets is visible in the evening sky, including Mars, which remains unusually bright throughout the month. Jupiter and Saturn are clearly visible from the midevening sky as well. Read more

Mars’ close proximity will brighten May sky

May should be a great sky-watching month in Hawaii. Mars will be brighter and closer this May than any time in the past 10 years; Jupiter and Saturn dance in the midevening sky; Mercury transits the sun on May 9; and throughout the islands, the first of the year’s two “overhead sun” days occur, a phenomenon unique to the tropics. Read more

Sky watchers have a chance to catch a planetary parade

During January, star gazers can view four of five planets with their naked eyes in the morning sky (Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn). In the final days of the month, Mercury joins theparty, making it possible, at around 6 a.m., to see all five planets at the same time with the naked eye. Read more


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