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High surf continues to pound Calif. coast

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A surfer dives off a wave near the Malibu Pier, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, in Malibu, Calif. Authorities warned swimmers and surfers to be careful because of high waves and strong rip currents that hit Central and Southern California through the day. Waves of up to a dozen feet were seen from San Luis Obispo to San Diego counties, the National Weather Service said. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A surfer, top, catches a big wave in Newport Beach, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011. Searchers scoured the Southern California coast Thursday for a swimmer who vanished in a rip current as authorities warned that dangerously high waves were arriving from a winter storm off New Zealand. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A large wave crashes behind a surfer at the Wedge in Newport Beach, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011. High tide and a winter storm off New Zealand are combining to bring high waves to the Southern California coast. The National Weather Service said waves of 8 feet to 11 feet or more could hit beaches from San Luis Obispo to San Diego counties through the afternoon and peak Thursday night or early Friday. (AP Photo/Orange County Register, Mark Rightmire)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Surfing champion Kelly Slater, right, rids a wave with another surfer near the Malibu Pier, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, in Malibu, Calif. Authorities warned swimmers and surfers to be careful because of high waves and strong rip currents that hit Central and Southern California through the day. Waves of up to a dozen feet were seen from San Luis Obispo to San Diego counties, the National Weather Service said. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Spectators watch as a surfer catches a big wave in Newport Beach, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011. Searchers scoured the Southern California coast Thursday for a swimmer who vanished in a rip current as authorities warned that dangerously high waves were arriving from a winter storm off New Zealand. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
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Photo Gallery: California Surf

LOS ANGELES >> Authorities are warning about dangerously high waves pounding the California coast that have left a swimmer missing and likely caused a marijuana smuggling boat to crash onto a beach.

Lifeguards conducted dozens of rescues, officials said. High surf also caused some damage to the Ocean Beach and San Clemente piers.

A high surf advisory was in effect until 5 p.m. Friday with waves of up to 10-feet high pounding beaches from San Luis Obispo to San Diego, the National Weather Service said.

The powerful surf probably forced a smuggling boat to crash on a Southern California beach where more than 500 pounds of marijuana washed ashore, authorities said Thursday.

California State Parks rangers found the abandoned boat split in half on rocks near Point Mugu northwest of Malibu, said Lindsey Templeton, a superintendent for the park system said.

Waves reaching 6 to 9 feet and "probably a lot of misjudgment by the cartel operating the boat" led to the crash, Templeton said.

"Obviously they didn’t check the surf or they risked it anyway," he said.

Authorities warned swimmers and surfers to be careful because of high waves and strong rip currents that hit Central and Southern California through the day.

The Coast Guard suspended its search for a missing body-boarder after a fruitless overnight hunt that covered 78 square miles of ocean. Jowayne Binford, 24, of Long Beach, was with three friends when he disappeared Wednesday evening about 200 yards off the Surfside area of Huntington Beach, Coast Guard spokesman Trent Kelly said.

Rip currents are strong channels of water flowing out to sea that quickly exhaust swimmers who struggle against them. Authorities recommend that swimmers caught swim parallel to the shoreline until they are out of the current.

"We could tell yesterday the waves were getting a lot bigger and the current was getting strong. The yellow (warning) flags were waving," said Rhonda Selmanson, who has lived in a seaside home at Sunset Beach for three years.

To the delight of surfers, occasional 20-foot waves slammed into the Wedge, a popular body-surfing spot at Newport Beach in Orange County.

 

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