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The hidden tunnels of Diamond Head

  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Brian Miyamoto of Hawaii Civil Defense and Denby Fawcett walk through the Kapahulu or Mule Tunnel. It is named after the mules that hauled construction materials through the tunnel on narrow-gauge railroad tracks.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Denby Fawcett, author of the new book “Secrets of Diamond Head:?A History and Trail Guide,” examines a telephone switchboard in M-O Tunnel.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Brian Miyamoto of Hawaii Civil Defense inside Battery Hulings tunnel, now used for storage.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    The Hawaii Civil Defense Emergency Operations Center in Birkhimer Tunnel. The tunnel is one of only two Diamond Head tunnels used on a daily basis.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Author Denby Fawcett examines boxes of state government records and artifacts stored in M-O Tunnel.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Former state parks programs manager Clyde Hosokawa walking into M-O Tunnel.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    The door to the tunnel into Battery Hulings.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    A room off the M-O?Tunnel houses circuit breakers and air ventilation equipment.
  • CRAIG T. KOJIMA / CKOJIMA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    The tunnel inside Battery Hulings, which was built by the U.S. Army in 1915. The battery comprised a pair of 4.72-inch, quick-firing Armstrong guns to defend the Waialae-Kahala coast. Today the tunnel is used for storage.
  • COURTESY U.S. ARMY MUSEUM OF HAWAII
    This photo was taken in 1910 inside Diamond Head crater.

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