comscore Coast Guard, state, monitoring attempts to remove sailboat grounded off of Kaimana Beach | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Coast Guard, state, monitoring attempts to remove sailboat grounded off of Kaimana Beach

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                A 33-foot sailboat called “Prelude” got stuck on a reef at Kaimana Beach on Sunday afternoon. The U.S. Coast Guard today said it is working with the state to remove a sailboat which ran aground off of Kaimana Beach.

    CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    A 33-foot sailboat called “Prelude” got stuck on a reef at Kaimana Beach on Sunday afternoon. The U.S. Coast Guard today said it is working with the state to remove a sailboat which ran aground off of Kaimana Beach.

The U.S. Coast Guard Wednesday said it is working with the state to remove a sailboat which ran aground off of Kaimana Beach.

The 33-foot sailboat, Prelude, has been grounded since Sunday afternoon, when Sector Honolulu watchstanders received a 3 p.m. report that the sailboat was disabled. Honolulu Ocean Safety rescued three men from the boat that day and brought them safely to shore. No injuries were reported.

Bob Caires, captain of the vessel, told the Star-Advertiser on Sunday he was returning from a trip to the Diamond Head buoy.

“I got too close to the reef,” said Caires, who has been sailing for 70 years. “We lost our main sail, it was in tatters. The engine was running, but with these big waves, we had difficulty getting out through the waves… I apologize. I’m sorry.”

State officials said the owner has contracted Parker Marine to remove the boat and take it to Keehi Small Boat Harbor. Those efforts, however, have been hampered by winds and ocean conditions.

The company told the state Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation it will try again at high tide Thursday.

“Salvage of vessels in the marine environment can be complex and time consuming,” said Coast Guard chief warrant officer Russ Strathern in a news release. “Just when you think you have the right plan, the environment or the vessel doesn’t want to cooperate. In this case, weather and tides have hindered the salvor’s attempts. We will continue to work with our state partners to monitor the owner’s efforts to safely mitigate impacts.”

Swimmers reported a discharge of diesel this morning, the Coast Guard said.

The reported maximum pollution potential of the boat includes five gallons of diesel fuel, engine lube oil, and marine batteries.

Private salvors said they have removed the marine batteries and a portable fuel canister from the boat, and that its internal fuel tank contains water only. They have also collected diesel-coated debris from the vessel and shoreline for proper disposal.

The Coast Guard asks the public to exercise caution near the grounded boat, and to report signs of pollution.

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