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Kokua Line: Gov. David Ige’s order tells Hawaii stores to enforce mask rule

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                Businesses that don’t enforce the mask rule “may be subject to enforcement, including fines and mandatory closure,” according to the proclamation.

    CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Businesses that don’t enforce the mask rule “may be subject to enforcement, including fines and mandatory closure,” according to the proclamation.

Question: Can a store refuse me entry if I don’t have a mask?

Answer: Yes, it’s not only allowed, it’s required, under Gov. David Ige’s emergency proclamation governing pandemic-era life in Hawaii, which says that “all individuals shall wear face coverings over their noses and mouths when in public settings” and that “an owner or operator of any business or operation shall refuse admission or service to any individual who fails to wear a face covering,” unless an exception applies as described in the proclamation.

Businesses that don’t enforce this rule “may be subject to enforcement, including fines and mandatory closure,” according to the proclamation, which emphasizes — with italics — that businesses shall enforce the provision, not simply that they may do so.

The governor’s office has said that the mask mandate applies statewide, as agreed to by all four counties and the state government.

You can read the proclamation at 808ne.ws/proc16. See Exhibit J.

As we’ve said previously (808ne.ws/129kline), there are multiple exceptions, including for children under the age of 5 and people whose underlying health conditions make it risky for them to wear masks.

Q: Regarding the COVID-19 vaccine, there is more than one type of vaccine and the news says you have to get more than one shot. Are they interchangeable?

A: No. “Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require a two-dose regimen. The second dose must match the brand of the first dose. The second dose of the Pfizer vaccine needs to be administered not less than 21 days after the first dose, while the Moderna vaccine needs to be administered at least 28 days following the first dose,” according to a news release Thursday from the Hawaii COVID-19 Joint Information Center.

About 81,000 people in Hawaii are expected to receive their first dose this month, starting with front-line health care workers.

Q: What time zone do I use for my pre-travel COVID-19 test?

A: The time in the city from which you are departing to Hawaii. The test must be taken within 72 hours of your scheduled departure to Hawaii, and you must have your negative test result before you depart. What time it will be in Hawaii when you land is not relevant.

“The test will need to be taken no more than 72 hours before your flight departure time. If you have a multi-city flight itinerary, the departure time is from the last city you leave before arriving at a Hawaii airport (e.g. if your travel is from Chicago to Seattle to Honolulu, the departure time to look at is your flight from Seattle),” according to the state of Hawaii’s COVID-19 portal, hawaiicovid19.com.

Q: I tried to order a duplicate ID by mail but it didn’t work. Didn’t you say that was allowed?

A: Yes, but only if your state ID is still valid, meaning unexpired or expired but extended due to the pandemic (the extension applies to Hawaii driver’s licenses or state IDs that have expired since March 16). The ID you were trying to duplicate expired last January, outside the allowed extension period. For more information, see honolulu.gov/csd and click on “Changes to Operations.”

Auwe

Auwe to a sad sign of the times: Disposable face masks littering the landscape the way those thin plastic bags used to be, stuck up against the chain-link fences. I see them everywhere! Unlike the old plastic bags, I am afraid to pick up the face masks and throw them away myself. — A reader

Mahalo

I went to the post office in Waipahu to mail some packages for my daughter. It was three boxes and the bill came to $47, which was more than I expected. As I stood there thinking about how to pay the bill, a kind young man in line handed me a $50 bill. I didn’t get his name, unfortunately. I want to thank him so much for his generosity. — Sylvia


Write to Kokua Line at Honolulu Star-Advertiser, 7 Waterfront Plaza, Suite 210, 500 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu 96813; call 529-4773; fax 529-4750; or email kokualine@staradvertiser.com.


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